One of the few good things to come out of Lockdown is Bandcamp standing by their toiled artists and offering the consumer a day to purchase to their heart’s content knowing that their money is going straight into the artist’s pocket. These events have been highly successful and a much needed financial assistance to musicians whose income has taken a potentially massive dent. There is a lot of content on Bandcamp and this can intimidate all of us, not knowing where to invest our hard-earned cash. Here are a few of my recommendations to consider if you are looking to get involved.. 
‘Exile Parlour’ – the latest release from Merseyside’s Post Punk rising stars Eyesore & The Jinx. Hypnotic basslines, beautifully distorted guitars and targeted concise lyrics giving them the make-up of a coherent Fall. Released on Eggy records. Currently, on Bandcamp, the bands discography is available on digital format for the bargain price of £6.19. What are you waiting for?

 

Neonic Sunrise
‘Lies Paradise’ – Debut LP from Moscow based Neonic Sunrise. Very hard to categorise this group with the sound changing and adapting track to track, with influences coming in the form of Garage Rock, Post Punk and Shoegaze. Stand out tracks for me being Heal and single Taste Your Lips being my favourite single of the year so far.

 

 

 

 

 

Bambara
Stray(Wharf Cat Records) – Finally we have the third outing by the Southern gothic trio Bambara. This LP came out in February and was criminally overlooked but its not too late to get it on your album of the year list. Often compared to Nick Cave, although I feel they are an intimidating mix of both the Bad Seeds and the harsher Birthday Party with excellent Cow Punk chops giving a nod to the Gun Club at the same time.

 

 

 

 

Author: Dan Kasm

 

JSK & The Lockdown Lovers – ‘Lockdown Lover’  A late call up comes in the shape of Johny Skull Knuckles and his Kopek Millionaires who’ve recorded a special track for this special Friday on Bandcamp.  He’s also promised a special video to accompany it as well so get stuck in ya rock and rollers. Of course it’s good. Its got plenty of heart and exactly what you’d expect from Johny, great chorus and all the sleazy Rock and Roll chops you could want. the second track sees Skull Knuckles reach lofty notes he’s not reached in a while I’d guess? but he’s riffin like a good un here and turning up the Rock! go Johny and go good people of RPM Online world and support these artists on this Friday seeing as Bandcamp have done the right thing and given a bit more back to the artists who underpin their success.  (Take note Spotify and other streaming sites) Bandcamp

If Rob’s name is familiar it’s because he was a member of Government Issue and Artificial Peace — two iconic Washington, D.C. hardcore bands.

Looking to get back into the rock ‘n’ roll game, Rob called up old friends and friends of friends to record an album of new material. While a bass player in his past, Rob now plays rhythm guitar and sings lead vocals.

Tell us about your current album. How did it come together?

Rob Moss and Skin-Tight Skin is the first music I made since I was the bass player in Artificial Peace and in Government Issue in the early 1980s. A few years ago I picked up a guitar and taught myself some covers. Then I wrote a bunch of originals and posted them on Facebook. A friend asked if I wanted to record them in his studio.

You have a different lead guitarist on every song. Why is that, and how did you get them to play on your album?
I wasn’t sure I had time to put together a working, touring band. And asking a lead guitarist to record 14 songs as a favor would’ve been a lot to ask. I thought it might be easier to ask 14 guys to play lead on just one song. So I called up old friends and friends of friends, thinking the worst they could say is ‘fuck you!’ Only two turned me down.

 

But kidding aside, it gave me the chance to work with guys who mean a lot to me. Back in 1979, I first saw Marshall Keith in the Slickee Boys. They were having so much fun on stage that I wanted to start my own band even though I didn’t know how to play an instrument. And around the same time, I first heard Bob ‘Derwood’ Andrews on the first Generation X album. That those two guys – and many more of my favorite musicians – would play on my new album is beyond tremendous.

 

How did you get ‘Derwood’ to say yes?

I just asked him.

 

What’s the response been to the album?

Many people comment on the song quality. That even after hearing the album once, they find themselves humming the songs. The earworm thing. To me, that’s the best compliment.

 


What was the early Washington, D.C. scene like for you?
It was new and fun, and things happened fast. Brian Gay (the original bass player in the GIs) and I started writing songs before the Teen Idles or any of the Dischord stuff happened. But there were almost no all-ages shows back then. Marc Alberstadt (original drummer in the GIs) has brother a few years older than us. He’d sneak us into places. That’s how we first saw the Slickee Boys, the Bad Brains, Tina Peel, Sorrows and other bands.

Musically, Brian and I took cues from :30 Over DC – a compilation album of local bands that came out in 1978. We formed a band called The Indians around the same time that Government Issue started. Brian on guitar, me on bass, Mike Manos on drums and a female singer. After one show, Steve Polcari replaced her and we changed our name to Assault and Battery.

 

We were still in high school and played shows with S.O.A., Minor Threat, the GIs and others. In September of 1981, Brian went to art school in Chicago. So Pete Murray, who’d been in Red C, became our new guitar player and we changed our name again.

As Artificial Peace we played mostly in the DC area, Baltimore and New York City. We were on the bill with a lot of early hardcore bands, including the Bad Brains. We also played with Black Flag on their Damaged tour. Recording-wise, we did a few sessions. One of which had three tracks on the Flex Your Head album and that entire session was later released as an album on Dischord.

 

I was going to University of Maryland, while the rest of the guys in the band were going to community college or not at all. I’d come home on weekends to practice. I had limited time, I wanted to work on new songs. But, at the time, they were less driven. That led to the band breaking up. They formed Marginal Man, and I went on to join Government Issue and play on their ’83 USA tour.

 

After the tour I learned I got accepted to transfer to a school in Boston. Stabb and Marc understood. But Tom was not too happy, knowing he’d have to break in another bass player. And by that time, for me, the scene was not so fun. People took themselves too seriously.

 

Today it’s easy to know what’s going on in different cities. How did you do that pre-Internet?

I had pen pals. Vote Vasko in Finland. And a bunch of kids in LA, Northern California, Toronto, Vancouver and elsewhere. We’d send each other letters about what was happening. We’d trade flyers, fanzines, cassettes and vinyl. So, we were aware of what was going on in different scenes.

 

Of course, there was Yesterday & Today Records. Skip Groff, the owner, would bring back records from London. He’d stock imports. Other than trading, that’s where I got most of my punk records.

What’s your plan, post-pandemic?

Well, I was never completely set on forming a touring band. I’m more interested in songwriting. So how things will affect me once venues open up is unclear. And I’m not sure I could find one lead guitar player who could do all those songs justice. As far as recording a follow-up album, I’ve written more songs that are as good or better than the 14 on the current album. I’d like to record them. We’ll see.

 

The album’s available as a CD and digital download on Here on Rock On Records

 

Note: the full list of musicians on the album can be found on the Bandcamp page and the album’s available as a CD and digital download on Bandcamp at the link above

FOLK DEVILS have returned with their first new music in 33 years. The band blazed a trail across the UK’s independent music scene of the mid-80s with their unique brand of post-punk energy, known for their acclaimed indie-chart singles ‘Hank Turns Blue’, ‘Beautiful Monster’, three John Peel sessions, plus live dates opening for Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, The Fall, The Gun Club, Screaming Blue Messiahs and others.

The 3-track Forever EP lands on 10” (clear red vinyl) and digital on 18 September via Optic Nerve Recordings and features two new compositions, the title track ‘Forever’ and ‘My Slum Soul’, plus an incendiary new version of an old live favourite ‘Ink Runs Dry’.

Recorded at London’s famous Konk Studios in North London and mixed and co-produced by Grammy Award-winning engineer Rik Simpson, the re-born Folk Devils drew inspiration for new recordings from the release of their 2016 career retrospective Beautiful Monsters (Singles & Demo Recordings 1984-86) and the excellent reactions at subsequent live shows around the UK with kindred spirits Membranes, Inca Babies, The Wolfhounds and The Cravats.

Founder members, guitarist Kris Jozajtis and bassist Mark Whiteley, reformed the group by recruiting members of a short-lived 1987 version of Folk Devils; guitarist Nick Clift and drummer John Hamilton. Together with singer Dave Hodgson they soon discovered they had created a well-oiled twin-guitar juggernaut that brimmed with the same restless, twisted blues that characterized the first and second iterations of the band from 1983-87 when they were fronted by the highly underrated and now sadly-departed singer/songwriter Ian Lowery. Hodgson, a fellow transplant from the North-East, had known Lowery in the early 80s prior to Folk Devils, when the two were in their respective post-punk bands Ski Patrol and Parting Shots.

Bandcamp / Facebook

THE BIRTHDAY MASSACRE
DIAMONDS
UK TOUR 2021

28.07.21  YORK Fulford Arms
29.07.21  NEWCASTLE Cluny
30.07.21  EDINBURGH Opium
31.07.21  GLASGOW Ivory Blacks
03.08.21  MANCHESTER Night People
04.08.21  NOTTINGHAM Rescue Rooms
05.08.21  WOLVERHAMPTON Slade Rooms
06.08.21  BRISTOL Exchange
07.08.21  LONDON Garage
tickets and information
flagpromotions.co.uk / ticketweb.co.uk / fatsoma.com

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 crisis, Canadian post-punk goth act The Birthday Massacre have been forced to postpone a November 2020 UK tour to promote their new album, ‘Diamonds’, which was released in late March. All nine shows have now been rearranged for the summer of 2021, as per the itinerary above.

The tour will be the first opportunity for UK fans to see two recently installed group members, drummer Phil Elliott and bassist Brett Carruthers, perform with the band. Carruthers is also the frontman of fellow Toronto-based act A Primitive Evolution, who released an excellent album of industrial tinged rock entitled ‘Becoming’ on Metropolis Records in 2018 and have remained an ongoing concern.

Always love a split when I like one of the bands and have no clue about the other but the fact they’ve tag-teamed means the odds are good that I’m gonna like what I hear. I’ve reviewed Thee Evil Twin before and love what they do.  It’s a no brainer for me I love me some sloppy loud punk rock with a tune like playing some pop song but trying to play tough to impress a girl so rough it up and chew some bubble gum Stiv style whilst you’re at it well that’s Thee Evil Twin that is.  ‘Let’s Go Again’ has got the 50’s girl group backing vocals repeating the guy lyrics and a super sloppy solo with a great hook on the chorus and plenty of handclaps – I’ll take it.

Don’t leave the room though because ‘Say The Wrong Thing’ is coming like a runaway train as it steams through your speakers. Call it garage Rock and Roll or garage punk call it what you like just make sure you call it. This release is tinged with sorrow as well for this is their swan song as Thee Evil Twin are bowing out and calling it a day which makes these songs a little bittersweet because as a band they totally rock and have some top tunage. But wait that’s only the half of it because as far as I know Their split partners The Missile Studs aren’t calling it a day so its a G’day from these Shitsville SA punks (Adelaide I’m led to believe). Five tracks from each is the order of the day and Side AA sees The Missile Studs open with Their theme tune and in fine snotty form its perfect Briefs, Ramones territory of punk rock.  The songs sound live and full of trash and they can count to four as they show off on ‘Stockholm Love’ as the sound hits you in waves of Dee Dee like melodies and Johnnys downstroke guitar thump.

It’s a very pleasant rendition of the Subs classic ‘C.I.D’ they do a wonderful job to be fair not fucking around with it yet giving such a classic the respect it deserves – good work. So Ten songs from two bands kicked out like ’77 never happened with passion and verve and I like it – its nice to just leap around the house to some Australians spitting out punk rock because they do it so well.  Get on it folks you know you want to.

Buy Here

The Missile Studs Facebook

Thee Evil Twin Facebook

Author: Dom Daley

Well, with a brand new album on the horizon we wanted to get the lowdown on whats going on with Tommy Ray and where he’s at musically. Having been a long time admirer of The Cry! and his punk rock record The Decayed Tommy branched out as a solo artist with an impressive debut solo album so, it was time to find out what makes the guy tick and where he’s at with the new record so here’s what we got once we tracked him down…

Solo record number two already you seem to have hit a rich vein of songwriting.  Are you writing all the time?

Literally, “all” the time. It’s how I see life; big hooks and jagged verses. My mind is always busy making verse or thinking through a production.  Right now, not including “Handful of Hits” LP and the dozen tracks I am holding back for a third “The  CRY!” record (hopefully),  I have over 50 titles in some active stage of production.   I will never have time to finish them all.

As far a the quality of songs, I guess that’s up to the listeners.

I think most people saw The CRY! as your vehicle and you are their focal point for sure.  Where are you at with The CRY!?  Could you not just have released the solo album under The CRY! banner?  starting over even in the internet age seems like a bold move.

Naw. The CRY! is a band and that owes its sound from the members creating collaboratively. TOMMY RAY! Is me doing me.  They are similar sounds for sure but my solo stuff has a much harder edge and the lyrical content is more real-life and not as clean cut.

Right now, The CRY! is dormant. Brian Crace (singer/guitarist/co-founder) and I have some pretty bad blood going that needs to get taken care of before we can work together. In time I think we will work it out. Brian is my favorite guitar player and life is short.  I do have an LP worth of material and have five or so tracks nearly completed but there doesn’t seem to be the same energy to complete the project with Brian and I not working together.  Also, our bass player (Michael Cortichiato) recently left Portland to play with Dr. Boogey in LA (I love those guys and wish them all much luck).

Photo by Michael McDaniel Photography.

Going back to the debut solo record, I think it was a familiar sound obviously with your voice on it but there’s more of an edge to the sound, is that fair?  In your opinion was it the best record you’ve made to date? Even songs like ‘Coming Back’ whilst having the keys is a rougher edge.

All fair!  But the records are all different.  But, here goes:  It is really close but I like the first CRY! record better than the ‘Dangerous Game’ LP.  I recently listen to both and was really proud to be part of that.  They are both really great records but I like the rock & roll feel of the first record just a bit more than the glammy feel of the second record. Brian wrote more of the 2nd record (‘Seventeen’, ‘Hanging Me Up’, ‘Toys In The Attic’. He also co-wrote a few tracks) and that is reflected in the overall sound of the record.

Also, Evan “Maus” Mersky and Dave Berkam also were HUGE contributors to both studio LPs by The CRY!. Maus recorded, engineered, and played amazing drums while Dave is simply a brilliant all-around musician.  His current band “The Reverberations” are pretty cool.

I like the song-writing and production on the TOMMY RAY! Records because (as you accurately stated) the songs are honest, gritty, and produced only as much as needed to get the point across.  My mind is a pretty chaotic place these days and I think that that gets across.

Bottom line: I like the new “Handful of Hits” collection…(until the next record) Buy it!

The Decayed is real buzz saw punk rock DIY record?  What’s the story behind that record?

That’s my shit!  The Portland street-punk scene is where I grew up. I am proud to say that these songs were NOT all written by me. There are songs written by my early bandmates that we played at hard-core house shows and notorious drunken events.  We had no way of recording tracks at the time, I didn’t want the songs to be lost, and I still feel the youthful angst so I figured it was time roast those old chestnuts one more time.   My old bandmates are super psyched to see me bring back those piss & puke proven classics!   My next record project will likely be a 2nd Decayed record.

Coming up to date tell us about the new record?  Whos playing on it?  Where was it recorded?  What’s it sound like?

Truthfully, I played guitar of only a handful of The CRY! recordings.  We had better players in Maus, Dave and Brian so I was happy to just write songs and sing my parts.   We always said that the best player should record the parts, and they did!   Of course, I played the parts live.

Now, I have learned how to play all the instruments so when I made “solo” music, I did it solo.  I mean, I recorded all the parts tracks myself here in Portland.    I think Brian may play a guitar part (like on Suzanne from the last LP) and Corsh was involved with recording a couple of tracks but the most part it’s all me.

It sounds like me.  Not sure who to compare it too… it’s honest…

What’s the lockdown been like for Tommy Ray?

Fucked.

I don’t like it.

I just don’t like it.

What influences have been coming out in your new record? I remember hearing a banana stand performance where you did modern kicks and thinking it was the perfect cover for you and you totally owned it?  What other covers you been jamming on?

I seem to recall you asking this question a few years back and my answer is the same as always. Ramones. Exploding Hearts.  Ramones. Paul Collins. Ramones. Beach Boys!

I really like a 3 min pop song that moves.  You know, “Don’t bore us. Get to the chorus.”

I’ve been playing tons of music and busking in downtown Portland during the recent protests.  Where there are people, I will play music.   I play mostly standards from the past 50 years.  Never gets old.  It’s my favorite thing to do.  My dad plays a little guitar and slams through the old hits like a savage for hours.  I learned from him…

Pandemic easing what are the chances of you coming to Europe and the UK for some shows?

Hell yeah, invite me and I’ll bring the boys and kick it.  I’ve never been to the UK.  I would like to tour Scandinavia too.  My “never suck” policy means the shows would always be epic!

What other bands and performers out there currently delivering the good in your opinion? Who would you think were the right bands for you to go out on tour with?

I’d love to tour with Green Day.  They bring the goods and I could learn a ton from Billy Joe. Mad respect there. Tuk Smith and the Restless Hearts are crushing it these days. Love his shit.   Shit, there are so many great talents out there    I will tour with anyone that is not boring.   Too many live acts are fucking boring.  Great skills, okay songs, but boring and lacking any “rock & roll”.

So there you have it. the new solo album is out in October and its a belter if you’re already a fan then you’ll love it and if you’re not – why not?  Its only Rock n Roll kids and Tommy Ray does it really well.

 

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The cult Irish alt-rock quartet, Kerbdog, have today announced that they have teamed up with Hassle Hindsight, the recently launched re-issue label from the team at Hassle Records, to re-release their 1994 self-titled debut and its heralded 1997 follow-up “On The Turn”, their last full studio album before their first break-up in 1998.

Despite a small handful of re-union shows over the last decade, working on new material and putting out a live record, “Congregation”, released to acclaim in 2014, the setlists for those shows have been almost entirely made up with songs from their much-revered two 90’s albums.

“On The Turn” – which was recorded with Garth Richardson at the legendary Sound City Studios in Van Nuys, California – was a near perfect album, one that front-man Cormac Battle most recently described as “the right album, at the wrong time”. Their 1994 self-titled debut was recorded with Jack Endino, the producer of Nirvana’s “Bleach”, at Rockfield Studios, with Sepultura recording Chaos A.D. at the same time next door. Cormac says of their raw debut record: “I think some of what they were doing seeped into what we were doing. It made the record heavier and more chunky than we intended, but we were happy with the results.”

The band’s songs were powerful and inspired – like those early Dave Grohl songs of the same era – by the likes of Husker Du, and then Bob Mould’s subsequent work in Sugar; both direct and melodic, heavy but immediate. Kerbdog were, to many, their new favourite band.

However the explosive success of Britpop meant that their singles were at odds with daytime radio playlists and the mainstream press of the time, seeing them subsequently dropped by Mercury Records, two albums into a six-album contract. They struggled on for a year before playing their final show in Dublin the following year.

While the band looked initially destined to reside in the footnotes of rock history, their fan base unexpectedly grew and their albums, while out of print, seemed to find their way into the homes of determined rock fans. Recently an LP copy of “On The Turn” went for an eye-watering £300 online.

The attendances for their reunion shows – often five times the amount of people they played to while touring “On The Turn” – and the clear interest from people in hearing these records again inspired long-term fans Hassle to assist the band, and who will be releasing the records complete with their original artwork and liner notes.

Cormac says of the reissues: “It’s truly humbling to be bringing out the two Kerbdog albums on vinyl. They’re for the fans who’ve supported us from the beginning and vindicated those albums across the years, for those who came on board after we thought the albums were dead and buried and also for ourselves – mainly because I have only one copy of the On The Turn LP and I can’t afford to pay the extortionate prices on eBay!”

Pre-order “Kerbdog” and “On The Turn” HERE

Ahead of this Friday’s release, Strange Units Scott got in touch to tell us all about the EP. For the first time since last Novembers release ‘Strange Unit’ and since COVID-19 hit the globe a lot has happened and after testing out new material during lockdown Scott takes up where the band are at…

“Nail, Meet Hammer” is the first track taken from the next full STRANGE UNIT album. Following the release of “STRANGE UNIT” in November 2019, I began working on new material that I was testing during the “LIVE from the STRANGE ROOM” live streams earlier this year.

I then had a hard-drive crash and lost a bunch of tunes. That was a fucking HUGE bummer and took a punt at sending my laptop to a data recovery specialist to get my stuff back.

In the meantime, I downloaded some free apps that some music production companies made available for free, and had to use them to get ideas down. Now, these apps were sequencing-type software – Developed for non-guitar based music. I struggled with getting to grips with them but had to get ideas down, and “Nail, Meet Hammer” was a result.

When I got the laptop back up and running, and transferred the idea into the realm of ‘rock’ it was perfectly formed, although a lot more succinct and direct than anything I’d written before.

I roped in Stuart Richardson* to mix as we have not worked together since Midasuno’s debut single, and had Dave Draper to master it (The Wildhearts, Mutation, Ryan Hamilton) as he is also great and super easy to work with.

What really changed things was wanting to get a video shot, so worked with a team of brilliant local (To me in Geelong, Australia) team who brought the track to life – And I finally got to finish a music video with my good friend Jeremy Belinfante (Who shot the currently unreleased video for MUTATION’s “Devolution” which has tonnes of green-screened DEVIN TOWNSEND (NOTE – WE WILL FINISH THE VIDEO ONE DAY)).

I then reached out to Jon-Lee Martin (Of KONG / THEN THICKENS fame) with the video, who jumped on the chance to smash out the wonderful artwork.

Dylan (Bass) and Lee (Drums) now round out the STRANGE UNIT trio and will be playing our first show as a band this September.

RE: B-sides on the EP.

TRASH FIRE: I did think at one point this was going to be a single, but it doesn’t reflect how nuts the next album is going to be.
WHAT’S YR TRUTH?: Another track that was written earlier this year that also veered off course from the new direction.
SCENTLESS APPRENTICE: After watching Post Malone doing that live stream, I had to have a crack myself. This is the first cover I think I have ever done where I have managed to get my mark/stink over.

 

FOLLOW: Bandcamp
BANDCAMP RELEASE FEATURES EXCLUSIVE AUDIO/VISUAL BONUS CONTENT
SUBSCRIBE TO THE STRANGE UNIT YOUTUBE CHANNEL TO SEE THE OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO: Here

MUTATION:
JAWS OF DEAF:

As the world plays hokey kokey with COVID-19 we thought it was best to try and put a grin on the nation so first up today is this new track from The Slackers.  ‘Sleep Outside’

If a dash of Ska isn’t your thang then strap yourself in because Thundermother is an altogether different beast.  This four-piece Swedish Action Rock combo have the tunes and the swagger to Rock da house.

Finally something different again this time from Plague Vendor as they release ‘Night Sweats’ ahead of the album ‘By Night’. Southern California’s Plague Vendor release the sophomore Album that captures the feeling of ruin and regeneration, of charisma and catastrophe and of slashing at-the-night with nothing but pure electricity.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PLAGUE VENDOR, VISIT:
WEBSITE | FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM

After a 35+ year hiatus from music, Rob Moss recorded an album of 14 proto-punk-inspired rock ‘n’ roll songs, featuring 14 different lead guitarists, including:

Bob ‘Derwood’ Andrews – Generation X
Nels Cline – Wilco, Nels Cline 4
Don Fleming – Velvet Monkeys, Gumball, Dinosaur Jr
Franz Stahl – Scream, Wool, Foo Fighters
Billy Loosigian – Willie Alexander and the Boom Boom Band
Mario Monterosso – Tav Falco’s Panther Burns
Marshall Keith – The Slickee Boys
Brian Gay – Government Issue
Stuart Casson – Smash Fashion, Dove, The Meatmen
Saul Koll – The Lovesores

In addition to top lead guitar talent, Spit Stix (Fear) drums on two songs and Francesco D’Agnolo (also of Tav Falco’s Panther Burns) plays piano on another.

If Rob’s name is familiar it’s because he was a member of Government Issue and Artificial Peace — two iconic Washington, D.C. hardcore bands.
Looking to get back into the rock ‘n’ roll game, Rob called up old friends and friends of friends to record an album of new material. While a bass player in his past, Rob now plays rhythm guitar and sings lead vocals. From the opening proceedings of ‘Babble Tower’ to the curtain call of ‘Rock n Roll Is Dead’ Rob turns in an impressive array of songs from the confident punch of the opener, Rob calls upon his friends from back in the day to lend a hand and help out a Rock and Roll brutha and the array of talent does just that.
The list of guitarists lending a hand is impressive which also adds some colour to the palet of Robs straight up Dead Boys meets Social Distortion old school punk n roll. Chris Rudolph lets off some steam on ‘Babble Tower’ and straight into ‘Ugly Chair’ that has Rob drawling on a Lou Reed vibe with Saul Koll bending the six strings like a good un.
We take a slight detour on track four and wander through the Coops garden picking up a lick here and a shuffle there sounding like prime time Alice Cooper band is never a bad place to find oneself. Stuart Casson is the player who lends some Roll to the Rock that’s being cooked up. ‘No 48 Crash’ is solid 70s glam as a tip of the hat is made to the lady in leather who no doubt inspired the groove.
If you want another change of gear ‘Oxygenate’ has some classic rock swirling organ for good measure.  I must admit I always love me some sleazy rawk n roll with a snotty dash of punk rock swagger and ‘Real Fine Kitty’ might be generic but I love it and its strut all that’s missing is the horn section tooting surely Rob had a Memphis horn section in his little black book?
Brian Gay turns up for a little tip of the Johnny Thunders handclappin’ rock and roll on ‘A Maltese Falcon’ and when a record has too much Johnny Thunders licks on it I’m tapping out as well.
The track I anticipated the most was the final knocking with Former Gen X band member Bob ‘Derwood’ Andrews who to be fair plays the song and doesn’t use it to jerk out a bazillion notes where they’re not needed and besides he has the cowbell going on as well and when has a record ever had too much cowbell? Exactly.  Andrews is a fine addition but cmon guys ‘Rock and Roll Is Dead’?  Never, not on my watch and not on the watch of Rob Moss & Skin Tight Skin either.  If you still believe in punk rock and roll with swagger and plenty of ’70s inspired glam rock then what are you waiting for hit the link and pick it up.
Pick up the album Here