What I hear you say Two live reviews from Jim Jones in a couple of weeks.  Well, one is from the start of the tour and the other (this) from the tail of the tour.  Besides it would seem both nights were fucking spectacular so the internet being flooded (ok maybe not flooded) with Rock and Roll can only be a good thing and if you’ve never seen this band then take some advice and get down and get with it if they’re ever playing near you (which they probably will)

Johnny took care of the support act as I was busy negotiating the M4 that had taken on the look of a rapid river such was the downpour this evening.

If uber did arks you can bet your bottom dollar there would be a rank of them parked on Castle St just around the corner from Clwb Ifor Bach tonight. Such is the ferocity of the rain that walking up to the venue I think to myself that maybe I’ve walked onto the film set of Seven…or perhaps make that Severn as I by the time I do finally reach the gig I look like I’ve been for a dip in said river.

Why am I telling you all this? Well, it’s on nights like this that gigs can tend to suffer attendance-wise especially with walk-up crowds and some lost souls even when they have bought tickets in advance then simply can’t be arsed to get wet and make the effort to get out the front door. Not so tonight though as even before the ungodly hour of 7:30 pm there is more than a healthy number of Righteous Minds in attendance to bid a very warm welcome to last-minute support act Joe Kelly & The Royal Pharmacy.

Joe’s mix of deep south (wales) blues and folk actually proves to be the perfect pick me up tonic after our early evening soaking as the two-piece set up (of guitar and drums) deliver songs like ‘Home’ from their recent ‘The Road’ EP that spark and glow like a warm campfire that the audience can huddle around to dry off.

There’s a haunting quality to Joe’s guitar that recalls David Lynch movie soundtracks and his husky sour mash fermented vocals are straight outta the Usk Delta, whilst on earlier songs like ‘Babylon’ I can see why some folks are getting a little bit excited and calling him a modern-day Dylan.  As a band dropped in at the last minute to replace two other acts that had sadly fallen by the wayside due to illness Joe Kelly & The Royal Pharmacy just make their left of field take on this rock ‘n’ roll malarkey look oh so easy…

 

What, We carried a review from York on this tour but such is the undeniable force of nature that is Jim Jones & The Righteous Mind how could we not top and tail the tour? Having only seen the band play a few months ago on the opening night of the album’s release this was JJ&TRM having bedded in the new tunes and with some distance from their birth, this was another perfect night to check out one of the UK’s finest Rock and Roll bands currently treading the boards.  Like a finely tuned beast and with a new single on show they were never going to disappoint it was more a question of how good they were going to be.

 

In fairness to Jim he has always played this neck of the woods and this must have been the umpteenth time I’ve seen him perform with one line up or another and I’ve never left a show unenthused or thinking about missing the next time he breezes through town. Kicking off with the wonderful stomp of ‘Get Down Get With It’ it’s hard to believe that things can’t go anywhere but downhill from here but following on from the glam tastic cover its ‘Boil Yer Blood’ and a couple more from the marvelous debut ‘Super Natural’ before we get a peek behind the curtail and the band wheel in a wonderful dramatic ‘Shazam’. ‘Sex Robot’ and ‘Satan Got His Heart Set On You’ as the band then flip flop from one album to the other picking the audience up then slamming them down before knocking out a rough house version of ‘Helter Skelter’ the band are absolutely in tune with one and other as they spar off each other trading guitar lick or bass line or percussion fill with the lap steel and piano chipping in with uplifting fills at every opportunity.

Looking like the Cult of real Rock and Roll in their roll necks  or some brothers in arms armed with Guitars and music rather than Bullets and Bombs they’ll be queuing out the door to sign up to join the collective with these guys providing the soundtrack and message. It warms my heart to hear them rally against Austerity and tory Britain and how Shit Island is heading down the pan with clowns and Jokers at every turn but whilst were led by the snout by greedy politicians and right-wing loons I’ll take this soundtrack and I guess selfishly Great Rock and Roll always rises up in tough times and hearing the sermon of ‘I Found A Love’ for one evening the world outside can wait whilst I get carried away on a wave of Righteous Rock and Roll.  After taking a walk through the audience and taking the message to the people on ‘Base Is Loaded’ they are called back for an encore that they richly deserve.

With the clock ticking the band has time for ‘Hold up’ and a blistering ‘Alpha Shit’ before we rejoin the rank and file on the rainy street of Cardiff with our ears ringing and another night of the finest Rock and Roll you could wish for pumping around our hearts.  Amen to that Brothers Jim and the rest of the Righteous Mind you raised the bar a little higher than before – now when can we do it all again?

 

It only seems two minutes ago that Jim Jones And The Righteous Mind released their fantastic sophomore long player ‘CollectiV’ on the world. But after a three month break they are back with a new stand alone single entitled ‘Get Down Get With It’ on hot pink 7” and they are doing a run of live dates to support its release. The first date happens to be at my favourite local gig venue The Fulford Arms. Having only witnessed this band in full flow supporting in larger venues and festivals, it would be rude not to attend a full headline show, right?

 

Immingham’s finest exports Ming City Rockers open the evening’s entertainment in fine form to an already packed out room. The core of singer/guitarist Clancy and guitarist Morley seem to be keeping the good ship Ming flying, yet it seems every time I catch them they have a different rhythm section. That seems to be beside the point though, as whoever they have on bass and drums this week are pretty much up to scratch. The band’s sound is raw and ramshackle, but tight and punchy as fuck. In fact this is the best I have seen them and playing to a full room where the temperature is rapidly rising, can only be helping.

It’s not long before Clancy is stripped to the waist and shouting in-between songs at the crowd like Zed from Police Academy. The garage punk cool of ‘Sell Me A Lemon’ and ‘She’s A Wrong Un’ go down well and are perfectly delivered with the style and attitude that many of their peers can only dream of.

Clancy demands a volunteer from the audience to come and play his guitar for the final number or he will jump in and pick someone himself. Luckily some hapless punter steps up to the challenge, removes his shirt and straps on Clancy’s guitar as the smiling singer disappears into the crowd to sing the final song and bring their set to a chaotic climax.

They came, they saw, they conquered. Someone give these dudes a support tour sharpish.

The atmosphere is electric and the anticipation high as the headliners finally takes to the stage and Jim Jones peels off the opening riff to ‘Boil Yer Blood’. The familiar tribal beats fill the room as the song builds and the singer has the attention of every man, woman and child in the room. To his left Matt Millership bangs the keys, to his right Gavin Jay brings the low end, and just out of sight guitarist Mal plays some sweet pedal steel.

‘No Fool’ follows, drummer Andy Marvel beats out the most powerful of regimental beats as the frontman matches with dirty guitar and a deep bluesy hollerin’. If you thought Jim Jones And The Righteous Mind needed a gig or two to brush off the cobwebs after a 3 month live hiatus, you would be sadly mistaken. Dressed all in black, with matching turtlenecks and necklaces, the band fire on all cylinders for the next hour and a half and the energy levels do not diminish whatsoever. Even the claustrophobic confines of The Fulford Arms cannot hold back the raw power of the JJATRM machine.

‘Till It’s All Gone’ is all mad tribal percussion, maracas and cool as you like full band backing chants.

Jim and Mal ring seven shades of shit from their guitars, licks and riffs are peeled off with ease as the pair and the bassist aim their instruments to the crowd and to the ceiling for the majority of the set.

This is how live rock ‘n’ roll should be; raw, loud and sweaty… sublime. None of this Liam Gallagher ‘staring at the floor’ shit! This band gives everything they’ve got and they deliver songs, without pausing for breath, like they are unloading the magazine of an AK47 on an unsuspecting crowd.

 

The likes of ‘Satan’s Got His Heart Set On You’ and ‘Sex Robot’ from the recently released ‘CollectiV’ fit the set perfectly,  as the singer struts the stage and hollers from the depths of his soul, channelling rock ‘n’ roll from another era. The aforementioned new single ‘Get Down Get With It’ is suitably raw and powerful and a highlight of tonight’s frantic set.

I thought I had already witnessed the hottest gig of the year, but tonight Jim Jones And The Righteous Mind turned it up another notch. You could say tonight was a near religious experience, but whether Jim and his band took us to church, or towards the gates of Hell is up for debate. One thing’s for sure though, tonight was a lesson in how to fucking deliver and raise the stakes for all who follow.

Author: Ben Hughes

There are just 1000 of these beauties in existence and you’ll be able to get your hands on a copy when they hit the road on their 11-date UK tour. Some will also be available from select independent record stores.

So check the tour dates below, get yourself some tickets and together we’ll Get Down and Get With It!

Jim Jones and the Righteous Mind play:

SEPTEMBER

19 – York, Fulford Arms
20 – Manchester, Night & Day
21 – London, The Garage
22 – Bristol, The Exchange
26 – Norwich, Waterfront
27 – Brighton, Green Door [SOLD OUT]
28 – Cardiff, Clwb Ifor Bach
29 – Southampton, Joiners

OCTOBER

03 – Southend, The Railway Hotel
04 – Hastings, The Piper
05 – Bedford, Esquires

Get your tickets here

Friday night it’s pissing down and we’re heading to some town in the middle of the Welsh valleys for what promises on paper to be one hell of a night out.  Once we navigate around the one-way system (Manhatten it isn’t) we still manage to fuck it up mind you but the Gods are with us and as we enter the venue Deathtraps are about ten seconds into their set and Loud it is.  To be fair I’ve seen these boys a few times lately and by a country mile, this was the tightest they’ve sounded and kudos to the sound man because he got their Garage punk action rock sound lock-in and wringing the shit out of the sweet spot.  With two albums in and another on the way, This three-piece are on fire and the people of Aberdare are in early and in fairness giving the band a healthy round of applause and their uncompromising set is going down really well (and so it should) With a well-balanced set of songs from both albums with ‘Teenage Knife Crime’ Going down particularly well and sounding huge.  Once again an enjoyable set but having a great mix helped and that not something you can always say about support bands.

Next up were local lads Heavy Flames at first they ambled onto the stage and looked like a bunch of misfits (maybe they are I’m not judging) but to be fair once they started playing their bluesy garage rock n roll sounded decent.  Of course, I didn’t have a clue what the songs were but they sounded alright and Bez on the harmonica was a nice touch to the sound.  Leading the band and patrolling the front of the dance floor the singer had an excellent voice and really belted out the numbers and to be fair pulled everything together.  I possibly wouldn’t go out of my way to see them but if they were on the bill I’d make sure I was there in time to catch them play. Which is something the locals obviously agreed with because the room was filling up nicely as Aberdare got down with their local band and really got behind them.

Jim Jones & The Righteous Mind has a brand new record out and tonight was the first night of the tour.  I’m always pleased to travel to this kind of venue because it would be so easy for a band as good as JJ&TRM to give somewhere like Jacs a swerve and just play your usual handful of big city shows to people who are generally spoilt or get more than their fair share of live gigs.  Well, tonight much like the last time they played south Wales in Ebbw Vale Jim Jones & The Righteous Mind really put on a show and for the next hour and some delivered life-affirming, high octane, earth-shaking rock and roll.

With a decent crowd intent on having a good time the band didn’t look or sound like a band on the first night of the tour as they burnt through the set list like a band possessed with hardly any mid-song banter Jim kept it tight and let the music do the talking and as they threw out songs from the debut album and the new ‘CollectiV’ they were going down a storm.

My trusty travelling companion was witnessing the power of a Jim Jones show for the first time and commented that Jim had the best Rock and Roll voice he had ever heard in a live setting and he was indeed correct and it was an intuitive observation as Brother Jim bellowed out his words of wisdom from his rock and roll altar.  Decked out in matching turtle necks the band were in danger of overheating such was the heat generated from their performance as the audience moved as one to songs like ‘Shazam’, ‘Killer Brainz’, or the magnificent ‘Satan’s Got His Heart Set On You’ Even songs off the first album like the epic ‘Til It’s All Gone’ or ‘Boil Yer Blood’ went down a storm. This band are on fire and whatever they play just sounds like dynamite easily one of the best live bands anywhere and tonight they weren’t going easy on Aberdare as they played until they couldn’t physically play anymore and the performance didn’t drop one single percent had they been playing the Albert Hall or Jacs it matters not because Jim Jones And The Righteous Mind are about the people and getting out there and doing it these guys walk the walk and Aberdare was lapping it up every second of it.

If you want Rock and Roll played with passion, conviction and a tonne of brilliant songs then hit up Jim Jones And The Righteous Mind because these lifers deliver every single time and not a second is wasted with insignificant guff because time is precious and ‘I Found Love’ its called Jim Jones And The Righteous Mind the time to Testify is now people sit up take note and jump on board. The Gospel of Rock and Roll was set on fire in Aberdare and I was a witness Now come back and play ‘Aldecide’ you must have forgotten to play it this time.  Simply stunning! now to spread the word and get people to join the CollectiV because the evil power of Rock and Roll is alive and well and with bands like this it’s in safe hands –  for now.

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Author: Dom Daley

 

*Seeing is believing so this week we don’t just bring you the opening night of the tour but in a few days you can read what went down when Jim Jones & The Righteous Mind played the iconic 100Club London*

A man who should need no introduction if we lived in a world where people got their just deserts because if that were the case everyone would know who the fuck Jim Jones is but we don’t so here is a chat I had with the frontman and voice and driving force of Jim Jones and the righteous mind. They are about to release a stunning second album and head out on tour to support it.  You should check it out and take in a show it’ll be a revelation if your a newcomer and a celebration if you’re familiar.  So without further waffle ladies and gents, I give you Mr. Jim Jones…

 

We’ll, we’ll start off if that’s okay, With the new album. You decided to go down the crowdfunding route. Was it last June? When it was launched. What was the idea behind going down that sort of less traditional route?

 

Well, it’s less traditional, but I think it’s becoming the way to go with The music industry just changing on so many levels, so fast I mean;  you probably can see that you know like venues are disappearing more and more. you know, unless you’re doing something particularly  financially rewarding in terms of pop or something like that you know lucrative, if you’re doing music there’s more based in art or something that’s kind of a bit more from the gut There are very few people  in the industry that are going to hold the door open for  you. you know?  You know with the ongoing political backdrop of this austerity nonsense that just keeps rolling on and on your going to see more venues disappear and all that kind of thing and for me it all ties in with that you know.  like if you can’t figure out a new business model you’re going to die with the dinosaurs.

We talked about a lot and in the past, you know, we saw some people do, crowdfunding albums in a way just thought like just seems bit you know possibly a bit desperate or something like that but I think we just kind of had an awakening and realized it’s the way forward it’s the you know I mean it ties into me with the name of the album ‘collectiv’ is just really supposed to be reflective of everyone of people getting involved because that’s what I see as an antidote to you know the sort of  ongoing  crushing punishment that we get from the establishment day after day and their typical kind of call to arms is dividing conquer and you know the only source implanted I can sort of think of to combat that is get together,  get together, get involved,  and that’s become the sort of the rally cry for me because it is so messy business is a complicated business and the politics of everything and it’s like, it’s very hard, I think, is purposely so. You know, little bit like the law, you know, it’s made to be very kind of, you know, sort of confusing and gray because that just keeps your average working person who doesn’t have time, and everything, it just everyone gets the points I just don’t care I don’t get it and I don’t care you know, and they kind of do care because you know, and they go well, I’d rather put up with the shit than trying to wrap my brain around what’s going on here too confusing and so I think you have to go for life simple solutions and that’s my simple solution is get together get involved.

I think its taking the power back as well, isn’t it? you know, being captain of your own destiny sort of…

 

Yeah, you’re not waiting for a record label to tell you what you can or can’t do.  Absolutely, you know, you just press on. And it’s a no brainer really where it goes to the people that get it already, you certainly don’t have to convince anyone, these are people to kind of, do they see what you’re doing. I like what you’re doing and you’re doing it for them as well as yourself. Anyway, so it kind of it’s like, really like cutting out the bureaucracy. Yeah, and the red tape  just as between the artist and the observer, you know, the listener or, I’d like to sort of try and break that wall down even more.  I’ve done a lot of live shows, and I have a point of view about it. And my point of view is again, about that thing of being involved is kind of a ceremony of sorts and I think you can really be uplifted if you can give yourself over to it, you know.

And I really feel like in any, any concert even in a huge concert, you know, sort of thousands of people, there is just one person leaves, it will be a different night if they had stayed.  And I think everyone has that energy that they bring into the room when they come into the room. And so I guess like the whole record is sort of reflective of that theme , you know, kind of riffing on that whole thing of like,  what we can do together and, and with the political climate as it is, at the moment, you know, the backdrop that we’re working against, it just makes sense to, to sort of without trying to ram it down anyone’s throat you know, because no one ever learned anything by being told like you’re a stupid cunt people don’t learn by that.  you’ve got to find people that aren’t basing all their ideas on fear and hate Yeah, and that kind of stuff.

We’re kind of encourage people you know, get them to join. Jo Cox, that politician who got stabbed. I found out the guy that did it, he was like,  a little bit slower had mental health problems or something like that but he’d been kind of brought into that culture of, you know, kind of like neo-nazi beliefs and you just realize that that’s where we’re going wrong. He should have been brought into a circle of people that showed him, hope and encouragement and made and made him feel part of it rather than fear and hate people or what he is. It kind of might be like an easy sort of solution as to what to do with your time and your boredom but to have that sort of collective power everyone looking out for their neighbour; you don’t need to know who they are but just be aware they’re there.

Great rock and roll thrives when you have such a horrible government’s the same the punk was able to grow out of such adversity.

It’s a very similar climate. Yeah. You got something to kick against

The time you know, the time when you have to go okay, you know, I really don’t want you to put your foot on my neck any longer. It’s time to do something and Rock ‘n’ Roll is what we do.

I think most people most could be capable when things run tlike they do this past few years  they think “I want somebody to do it”, like there’s a point where it’s like this is just taking the piss  you know, you’ve been granted this power by everybody and you completely abusing it. It’s like  an abusive relationship you know and i think  people get to the point where they  get into a little bit of Stockholm Syndrome yeah where  they’re so used to being in a cage that I feel uncomfortable when the door gets opened you know and as I don’t know what to do – like the canary in the cage thing you sort of open the door then what next? It doesn’t fly away it doesn’t really know what to do.

It’s been so familiar with being caged up for so long, anyway,  this is a bit long winded but the crowd funding thing seemed to fit with that Yeah, you know, once we start thinking along those lines and like okay what are we doing what are we writing about what are we trying to achieve and because with the industry as it is you know I mean there are several generations now who don’t even know what Rock and Roll is so  a lot of people now instead of going to a gig  will put on 3d goggles and it’s just it’s not the same you know so it’s kind of like everyone to a certain degree is fighting  for survival and yet to come down to that thing of like what you care about and what you want and what what should we be doing at the moment and then you figure out a way to reflect that through  your art and creativity yeah and yeah it’s sort of like it feels like a cohesive  kind of balances with each other, the idea of collective where people get together again, get involved and the crowdfunding thing so sorry that’s quite a long answer ha ha

No no, we want to hear what’s behind the idea and what makes the band tick. Do find that doing it that way then it if you have a plan  of where you’re going to record how long it’s gonna take that, the better the crowdfunding does, the plans change and, you know, sort of enables you to take longer to record?

you know, I think when we first started, we thought what was the minimum we can do this work having never done a crowdfunding thing before. I had no idea how it would work or it would be horrible disaster. And in the end, we got twice as much as we sort of asked that was like, Yeah, great. You know you have this sort of right brief moment of celebration when you know the sort of the deadline finally closes and you go wow, Well, we’ve got this much money and and then you suddenly go like Hang on a minute for every penny you’ve got there there’s somebody expecting a product. Okay time to buckle down and do some work and we had I had most of the ideas for the songs but there was an amount of time that needs to be spent, you know, kind of honing them down and then go – little bit of pressure on you know. Whereas with a label, they’ll go like, Oh, you need a bit more time. Let’s set that release date back a little bit further but this way  we kind of we promised people;  you promised some or something and you sort of you feel, you know, responsible for that it’s kind of it’s like signing up for something you need to deliver for sure. You know.

With my history I’ve never cancelled  a shows.Unless its something pretty serious there was one where the drummer’s mum was rushed to hospital with cancer thats a different thing there but like other than that if you if you book it you do it you kind of you turn up there are people waiting to see you and it’s a responsibility but it’s a pleasure and an honour.

A unique privilege and responsibilities and you have to rise to that.

How much of the album the 10 songs were written?  or would you  just select the  bare bones or ideas  and flesh them out then?

 I always have you know sort of several ideas kind of bubbling along you know general things that I’m kind of working on and you know you just when it’s time to record you just start going through them one at a time and if one of them doesn’t really work very well. Okay, you just put that to one side, you know, I put it up on on blocks or use it for spare parts or you just leave it to, you know, serve as a project later down the line and then you go into the next idea and when something starts to click, you know, you just kind of feel it, and put all your attention into it. Sort of hone it into something worthwhile. But yeah, I mean, I think everything was pretty new apart from this one song called ‘Out Align’, which was a riff that I was trying to do something with back in the Jim Jones revue on the very last writing session, which is just before the band kind of broke up. Yeah, I had sort of a few ideas that I was working on some of those became stuff that went on the first couple of EP that did we do righteous mind and, and other stuff is still lying around, you know, in the spare Parts room and at one that that main kind of riff from ‘Out Align’  was one that I’ve been working on with that they never really kind of jelled  with the band with the Revue.  I always kind of liked it thought there was some mileage in it somewhere so let’s go back to it every now and then something happened it finnaly stuck.

 

How would you say you you write best? Do you come up with the songs yourself  or come up with the bare bones like the same with the riff and then you pass around in rehearsal room…

yeah yeah a little bit, a little bit of all things really. some sometimes like a riff that turns  into an idea in your head sometimes just knock it about on the guitar and you stumble on something that you like the sound of.  Occasionally you know I’ll wake up in the morning with  a fully finished tune in my head,  I don’t always have all the lyrics like some happen a good chunk of them enough…

 

Do you write quickly then?

You know sometimes things comes together after being very creative. Sometimes it’s like a real pain and you get a time but yeah sometimes its a real pain. These days I’ve learnt  that if you keep trying and it’s not going anywhere I can you put it into the spare parts pile  and just let it maybe it’s not brewed enough  – leave it  for a bit longer and come back to it.

 

I thought  the flow of the new album is exceptionally good.  More so than your previous work, you know.

Thank you very much. Well, it’s definitely got a continuity and that it was all recorded in the same period, you know, whereas the first record was done in sort of piecemeal you know, a couple of days here in a couple of days there. You know, sometimes they’ll be months apart.

Occasionally different people playing  on stuff. Whereas, this one was like a chunk of stuff I think we recorded 14 songs, and whatever, we did it over this, I don’t know if you remember how hot it was, and because of the soundproofing of where we’re working, we had to have all the doors and windows shut properly to play live and yeah, we would manage to three takes  before somebody may have to like sort of open the doors  to run outside and breathe for five minutes It was really so hot the range on your forehead was up, you know, and you can you try to belt out a vocal.  Yeah, It was very much like Memphis ha ha! I don’t know if there’s a Mississippi feel  to the record, but I would say those were  the conditions it was like super humid, super hot and yeah, we sort of turned it around fairly quickly. We had to to survive.  So pretty much like I think we had a delay of about a month  Because the guy who runs the studio, who’s the main engineer that we work with, he had an issue with his mom who lives in Munich was having some treatment for cancer. And it was one of those things where it’s like, you can’t really go without him you know, he’s  got to go and, and it’s like you wouldn’t say no about that.

man. You know, we got deadlines that we’ve given our crowdfunding guys that you know, it is what it is. Yeah, I think we just had to put out a newsletter to those folks and let them know to listen, you know, missed a little – a bit of a delay. It looks like it’s it’s not going to be when we originally planned. We were trying to aim for October last year and have everything out. But you know, these things happened along the way and everyone was quite understanding. And we sent out a couple of downloads for people to  listening to stuff while they were waiting. Everyone’s been good natured about it.

Is there a song on the album that captures what ‘Collectiv’ is all about or if you had to pick one to play somebody who wasn’t familiar with your band what would you play them?

It’s very hard to sort of sum it up with one track man uh…

I think in the same way that it was cool, ‘collectiv’ is something where we had the idea of picking songs that were quite diverse you know? i think you’ll see that there’s some that are similar in terms of that some are a bit more upbeat  and  some a bit more kind of, you know, dreamy  but even the ones that are dreamy have got like a different flavour to them.  I think it was that thing of like representing a bit of a metaphore  it’s like everything just because it’s different doesn’t mean it’s wrong it’s just you know there’s something else and they can live together.

The ebb and flow of the album works with songs like ‘Meth Church’  then ‘killer brainz’ totally different songs yet they  flow into one another and it works perfectly

Yeah, its like an afterglow or something after the intensity so yeah. When I sent out the first mixes to the guys in the band The guy who plays pedal steel and guitar Malcolm’s just messaged back. Saying,  Wow, It’s a Sonic feast. So Yeah, I think that describes it really well.  Theres certainly a lot going on. But, but at the same time, you know,  there is a lot going on. But it’s not studio trickery. There’s a lot of you know musicianship happening , I suppose. Yeah.

 

Have you been playing much of it in the set live?

Yeah. Well, its sort of  hard so far to do the dreamy stuff because it’s more about just being on fire and the energy of the other thing, I think when perhaps further down the line when the circumstances are right. We might even look at doing you know, two sets where we’ll do both. Do all the dreamy stuff and then and then come back on and do the fiery stuff and Four or five of the tunes off the album in the set.

We just did a little run of dates in Spain and yeah they went across really well.

I saw I saw the band when you played Ebbw Vale and saw the Revue plenty of times not knowing what to expect really, you know, is it gonna be more of the same but you know, but with the lap steel and more variety  I thought he was better now than the old band. you know?

Thank you. A few people have said that to me. The Revue definitely had its place like smashing you over the head ha ha with that, yeah, there’s just it’s a bit more three dimensional stuff  going on now. And I think in terms of like, music that you can listen to, you know, there’s a bit more depth to it, that you can sort of, revisit it, it’s not just driving music, and I mean, even though it works on that level.

Can I ask about the song titles of the new album? for the tracks on the album then the the song title of the sort of don’t give much away.  ‘Sex Robot’, ‘Meth Church’ ‘Dark Secrets’  they don’t give much away?

yeah I know yeah I can’t like some of the titles on the records were just informed with how the song sounded. Some like Meth Church’  for instance you know  something, funny enough, it’s not what you think it is. Yeah well funny enough like I was I was walking down… that song is unusual and I was on my way to do a benefit,  actually doing some cover sngs with Mick Jones you know, from the clash, Yeah, he did a thing down by the West way. And it was  a benefit for the Greenfell tower survivors and it was it was quite soon after it happened. So it was kind of in the shadow of this burnt  out building that was there but on my way walking down there I  remember I went over there on the train and walking down one of the lanes I think I took a wrong turning so  finding my way back down there I walked past this building and heard someone just tuning up the guitar on the inside and we just checking you know, they’re just tuning in and and it was started a thing in my mind. That’s what I thought they were going to play, which they didn’t because they were tuning up but it was the beginning it for me it was like oh, that could have been you know that’s just how I  hear something and you think it’s going to be this and it isn’t but the thing you thought it was going to be is your idea yeah. Anyway, I sort of made a quick note of what I thought the singing voice and the parts for the thing on just on the on the dictaphone app on my phone and I wanted to give it a title to remember what it was and I looked up and I was next to the Methodist Church so for some sort of short hand I wrote ‘Meth Church’   and then as I was writing the words, you know, the term meth you know, so that actually started to kind of, to leak into the lyrics and the thinking  you know. leak into the imagery of the stuff I was talking about.  so, yeah, that’s that’s how that one came in to play.

pastors so that’s the Methodist church that was my was my shorthand for well I happen to be standing when an idea came to me

 

and which like most people think of as I was about a drug den  but it’s actually not.  you know its about you know these poor people who burned to death and and musical idea happening so while I’m standing in this street in Ladbrooke Grove.

You also got to use one of Keith Richards guitars on the album

Alan from Dirty Strangers on his first album had Ronnie and Keith play originally but then they couldn’t release it because the stones legal team saying now you can use that the man because they released their own stuff so it couldn’t clash with Their own stuff.  Then several years back Keith gave him this acoustic guitar and it’s the one that he recorded with and wrote so many songs on back in back in the day it’s the guitar that’s on the beginning of ‘street Fighting Man’   and probably on like most of ‘Exile On Main Street’.  you can hear it at the beginning of the songs I think it’s the one that’s on ‘Angie’  you know, like loads of history in a lot of history and it probably wrote stuff even earlier before that as well 1964 the guitar is anyway, I knew I wanted some acoustic guitar on the record and  I was thinking about I wonder  if Alan will lend me the package and I phoned him up and he was he was saying like yeah look I’m rehearsing with my band  on Thursday in Shepherds Bush if you want to come over you can grab it and let me know when your done and I’ll get it back.  so I’m gonna do that I’ll definitely get a cab home I wont try and go on the bus home with that, and Alan says oh yeah,  if anything happens to it you have to give me the deeds to your house and you know like you’re laughing but anyway Can you imagine how much this guitar is worth? So I’m thinking I don’t know if I even wanted to take that much responsibility and I was thinking you know what if one of the cats knocks it over where am I gonna put it? anyway he called me back the next day he said listen I’ve been thinking about it and I spoke to Piere whos Keiths main guitar tech  and some other people in the stones  organization and they they kind of said to me Look at this is something that this can’t be replaced and yet you know you can’t really calculate that number so lending it out because something always happens. So  he said he said he still wanted to be able to let me use it so you can either come down to Redlands where I’m staying at Keiths place and do a little bit of recording there and then take the tapes back you know put them on your album or I can come and visit you at your studio if you just let me know what day and I’ll bring the guitar with me. and then at least if anything happens its  my responsibility and not yours and thats so super kind of him and I really would have loved to come down to Redlands yeah it just didn’t make sense  because all the backing tracks and stuff the machines were in the studio in East London where we were  working so it didn’t make sense to try and bring it down so anyway he came he came into the studio and spend the day and you know I played it on every song ha ha ha it didn’t need it on every one but I’m not missing that opportunity. Ha ha you know you can’t always hear it but trust me it’s there ha ha  It was such a beautiful guitar you could strum one chord and it sounded like a hit song it was so nice to play.

it made me wish that I’d had the guitar for a  while. Maybe when  we were doing the backing tracks you know certain instruments make  you play it in a certain kind of way. Every  instrument is different.  so for next album maybe I ask For the…

Tour

HAHA!

It  gave the whole thing a sense of occasion.

When does it hit the streets?

The Kickstarter folks will get it a little bit ahead of time and then I’ll release is the eighth of March

We’ve crossed the burning hot coals and now were ready for the thousand yard run up to the tour dates and then the release.  We’ve got a Mark Riley session then we’re looking forward to getting out on the road and touring.

 

 

what about Doing  anything else? You did thee hypnotic boxset and tour?

yeah that was you know I had a bit of time before getting ready to do this album and Beggars got in touch about this  project and it just seemed like “Oh, we’re looking at putting out this retrospective thing and it seemed like if we were ever going to get together then we need to stay in touch because like we rarely see each other because you just so busy only seems to be funerals or whatever when  we bumped into each other and this was just like the excuse to get together  and hang out again.  So we did  some shows. We got  to go out on the road it was a great way to sort of put the icing on the cake yeah let’s go out and you know do some gigs with Mudhoney and to wrap it all up going out with the guys we originally went out with back in the day seeing the  guys  it was like a school reunion. Yeah,

 

 I watched Danny Garcia’s ‘Stiv’ movie and Ray was interviewed  and there was footage of you guys on that day it was Stiv’s birthday party in Paris when you were on the boat.

yeah

yeah the start of the film yeah

okay and yeah I remember being on that boat like he really liked me and Ray and  took  us  under his wing I think he had our first single and really liked it and he was living in Paris when we met him and yeah that was really nice to know that.  We only hung with him on and off for a couple of years before he died so it was it wasn’t for years and years but it was really sad because he was he was like the first proper will kind of rock and roll you know bonafide lunatic ha ha  A legit Rocker. There was a mutual kind of respect and us being so  young I couldn’t  help admiring him and he was really helpful and really cool with us and he was like showing us footage of Alice Cooper,  great clips of early Alice Cooper and this and that you know he was really into and sharing stories about DeeDee and Johnny.  We were sort of all ears and yeah, then he died and after the funeral  his wife had the request that everyone had to snort some of his ashes. Not everyone did but we did ha ha it wasn’t good ha ha.

On that note, I guess we can thank you for your time Jim its been a pleasure and I look forward to the tour and hopefully the album gets a fantastic resposnse it deserves.

Thank You.

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MARCH

15 – Jac’s, Aberdare (tickets)
16 – MacArts, Galshiels
21 – 100 Club, London (tickets)
22 – Hope & Ruin, Brighton (tickets)
29 – Railway Inn, Winchester (tickets)
30 – White Hart, Corby (tickets)
31 – Music Hall, Ramsgate (tickets)

APRIL

04 – The Cluny, Newcastle (tickets)
12 – The Bullingdon, Oxford (tickets)
13 – The Barn, Portsmouth (tickets)
14 – Hare & Hounds, Birmingham (tickets)
19 – Dryden Street Social, Leicester (tickets)