2020 sees the third Cd Ep release from Kid Klumsy on STP Records, following on from 2018’s ‘Spit Your Dummy Out’ and 2019’s ‘Singing Our Souls’, the bands fun take on life, music and everything in between continues to progress alongside their ever-growing confidence on recordings and on stages (naturally currently on hold due to the worldwide pandemic).
This Six track EP sees Kid Klumsy return to the studio and open the EP with a subtle opening track ‘Boobs’ yup it is indeed called Boobs.  I guess it’s about chesticles, knockers, Breasts or just boobs.  A decent enough opener that is less metal than previous releases.  But the second track ‘Don’t Count On Me’ is much more like it.  With a decent bassline and Weab taking on the vocals in his own range that far better suits his style of delivery and the song is easily head and shoulders above anything, they’ve penned previously. It doesn’t stray far from the in yer face punk-metal cross over and fans will be drawn to the crunch of ‘Little Boy Thursday’.  The band sounds tight and aggressive on ‘The Lost Art’.  There’s nothing complicated about it and the vocal harmonies work well as does the guitar solos that will have fans reaching for the badminton racket (hang on like anyone who is into KK has a badminton racket) Cricket bat I mean. ‘Soup’ is blunter, its foot on the wedge and play hard.
As for the final track, I’m not sure if I’m meant to laugh or cry the crazy fuckers have only gone and thrown in a messed up ‘Caravan Of Love’.  I’m sure the finale to any Klumsy show will now forever entail a very messy singalong version of this. ‘Streets Of London’ it isn’t tongue in cheek? I so hope so and when the tape stopped I’d like to think they all fell about laughing out loud.  Daft Buggers. As Kid Klumsy evolves and finds their feet this EP shows they mean business.
There is a hidden extra track ‘Yesterdays Not Here’ featuring Rachel Reeves and is for a proposed album of Pete Shelley covers to be issued on Secret Public records initially as a digital download and at a nominal price, proceeds will benefit the Pete Shelley memorial campaign. https://www.yesterdaysnothere.co.uk/ . No offense Weab but this is the best track on the EP mate 😉
STP Records Here 
Author: Dom Daley
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ob03R84hGBM&feature=youtu.be

Buzzcocks should require no introduction. Forever embedded in pop culture of the late ’70s and to the punk and post-punk DIY movements, the group, led by frontman Pete Shelley and co-frontman Steve Diggle, brought an essential pop sensibility and sartorial style to the late last epic youth movement but are also tied to the last big youth explosion that was Grunge and Nirvana in particular.

Having disbanded in 1981, the band re-grouped in 1989 and continue to write, record and perform to this day, despite the saddening and untimely loss of Pete Shelley in 2018. This box set captures the eight albums and numerous singles the band produced with Shelley during a thirty-three year period, alongside previously unheard rarities, demos, outtakes & veritable treasures that lie under the lid.  Dismiss at your peril ‘Sell You Everything’ is an essential purchase as you should make all year.

We’ll start at the beginning of these eight discs and number one sees the band present their 1991 demos of the album some of which made it onto ‘Trade Test Transmission a couple of years later.  Thirteen demos of exceptional quality expanded to make a twenty-one song disc.  Sure there is a small amount of repetition with songs like ‘Alive Tonight’ and ‘Succesful Street’ cropping up a couple of times but very different versions to be fair and different enough to deserve duplicating. Of course, this demo album isn’t up there with the first four albums lets not pretend anything other than what it is but to fans (of which I would consider myself one) it’s fantastic to have all these songs in this format together on the one disc.  right, One down seven to go! Oh before we move on the demo version of ‘Succesful Street’ is far superior to the one on the EP!

Disc two is ‘Trade Test Transmission’ plus a few of Diggle’s home demos songs like ‘Energy’ which gives you a good idea of how the song came together even if this is much more like home recording territory god bless those Tascam4 tracks eh?

Disc Three is ‘All Set’ which was more in keeping with Buzzcocks from the sprightly opener ‘Totally From The Heart’ and I always loved ‘Without You’ it was the return of classic Shelley. As always when Diggle got behind the mic he always dished up a classic or two and his contribution here is the wonderful ‘What Am I Supposed To Do’. I always had a soft spot when Diggle got out the old acoustic as well and his contribution here was the albums closing number ‘Back With You’ but again its the demos at the end that hold the intrigue and a whole bunch of energy especially ‘Your Love’.  Laying fresh ears on this album has been a joy and a bit of guilt for not picking it up sooner over the last decade or so I feel shame for the neglect and won’t let it be another decade before it gets played.

 

Disc Four sees the band hit the tail end of the ’90s and having been back at it for almost a decade by this point and ‘Modern’ hit the shelves.  I loved how about this point the band were being referred to indie rockers and not punk pioneers or post-punk power-pop legends but they still had plenty of fizz on songs like ‘Rendezvous’.  They did test my patience as well I won’t lie.  ‘Don’t Let The Car Crash’ was a weird one as was ‘Doesn’t mean Anything’ and ‘Phone’ as well whilst we’re at it.  I always thought it was better suited to the solo material with all the samples but now looking back maybe I appreciate the band experimenting more. I always loved the more straight aproach of ‘turn Of The Screw’ and ‘Sneaky’.  Probably the lowest point of the band catalogue to be fair although adding the Townsend strum of ‘Autumn Stone’ Steves Buzz is very interesting as Diggle manages to sound hauntingly like Steve Marriott here.

 

The self-titled album of 2003 was a right return to form with fast songs that cut the crap from opener ‘Jerk’ and the thunderous ‘Keep On’ someone or something really lit a fire under the band who also were turning in some fantastic live shows around this time as well.  ‘Sick City Sometimes’ is a blinding track courtesy of Mr. Diggle.  ‘Buzzcocks’ was a stripped back bullshit-free bolt of thunder and lightning from the slashing hack of those guitars to the super-tight rhythm section a real beast of an album.  With only three bonus tracks here one being the demo of ‘Never Believe It’ and the final two cuts being a live rendition of ‘Paradise’ and a haunting bootleg out of the desk take of ‘Oh Shit’ that’ll strip paint if you play it loud enough.

‘Flat Pack Philosophy’ I remember having mixed press around the time and having pledged on a copy I remember it ticking a lot of boxes around the time of its release and listening back here it still stands up with songs like the title track and ‘wish I Never Loved You’ being a pair of belters to open any album never mind the bazillionth album of an illustrious career.  ‘Sell You Everything’ is another slice of Diggle gold but once again fans will be intrigued with the bonus cuts on offer sees ‘See Through You’ and ‘Darker By The Hour’ and its pop beauty before a filthy, raucous ‘Love Battery’ and ‘Sixteen’ – Job done another epic Buxxcocks album made even better by an abundance of additional material.

Now disc seven.  Probably the disc I’ve played over and over again since getting my mitts on this treasure trove of Buzzcocks goodies twenty-Four reworks of classic songs from right across the existence of one of the most exciting innovative and downright brilliant bands ever. I absolutely love it some songs have matured and improved with age and some of the later ones like ‘Turn Of The Screw’ fit in like peas in a pod – bloody brilliant. HAving Shelley bark out the words and melodies on ‘Boredom’ is exciting and don’t get me started on the bass line of ‘Fast Cars’ or the mesmeric qualities of ‘Why Can’t I Touch It’.  Anyone who witnessed the band performing over the last decade would have pretty much witnessed these songs played by this line up in this way and I can’t imagine one single person not bowing down to the majesty power, beauty and downright quality of what was on offer and hearing them rerecorded here gives nothing away as to the age of the songs in large nor is any quarter given by the band.

‘You Say You Don’t Love Me’ nestled next to ‘Turn Of The Screw’ or the bluster of ‘Breakdown’ preceding ‘Promises’ brings a tear to my eye. ‘Love You More’?  I don’t think I could right now and the sadness that washed over me hearing an enthusiastic ‘What do I Get’ knowing I’ll never get that live again but I do have this blistering set to fall back on.  ‘I Believe’ and then finally ‘Love Is Lies’ wraps up the disc that makes all this worth it.  If you had any doubt about picking this up then take a butchers at this running order and tell me its not worth it?  Absolutely bittersweet but sheer brilliance. and there’s still one more to go.

The box set of the year is wrapped up nicely with ‘The Way’ plus seven bonus cuts and the best box set to get released is done.  A real joy to behold from the audio to the packaging its a winner and a must-have not just for the die-hard fans but for anyone whos has ever sung along to a Buzzcocks track at a disco, pub, wedding whatever this is a must-have lovingly compiled and expanded and everything you want from a box set that sells you everything and not just goes through the motions. 160 tracks – 29 previously unreleased, what’s not to want?  Essential, simple as

Buy ‘Sell You Everything’ Here

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Author: Dom Daley

Photo by Andre Csillag

Today RPM would like to remember Peter Campbell McNeish born on 17 April 1955 but sadly passed away on this day twelve months ago of a suspected heart attack.  Can’t place the name? worry not because you will remember him as Pete Shelly one of the singer-songwriters from Buzzcocks and writer of classic punk tunes such as ‘Ever Fallen In Love (with Someone You Shouldn’t ‘ve?).

Shelley formed Buzzcocks with Howard Devoto after they met at the Bolton Institute of Technology in 1975 and after the pair travelled to High Wycombe, to see the Sex Pistols. The band included bassist Steve Diggle and drummer John Maher; They went on to make their debut supporting the Sex Pistols in their home town of Manchester.  After the band went onto an indefinate hiatus it was touring or being asked to open for Nirvana around North America that sparked a renewed interest in the band and they never looked back.

McNeish changed his name to Shelley after his favourite romantic poet which shouldn’t come as a surprise with the style of songs and the lyrics Pete wrote throughout his career.  From the debut classic ‘Spiral Scratch’ right through his solo years and up until his untimely passing as a member of the reformed Buzzcocks sadly he missed his bands playing at The Royal Albert Hall  Pete Shelley is sadly missed and has left a giant hole in the hearts of many fans around the globe.

The first three albums are regarded as the classic years where Shelly was thrust into the frontman role ably assisted by Diggle but it was Shelly’s melodies on hits like ‘Ever Fallen In Love’ and ‘What Do I Get?’ the band hit something of a wall in 81 after the release of ‘Singles Going Steady’ and a dispute with their then label.  He went on to have a decent solo career until he and Diggle reformed the band in 89 with the release of ‘Trade Test Transmission’.  there were several new albums from Buzzcocks including ‘The Way’ and ‘Flat Pack Philosophy’. His death was broken to the public through his brother Gary via Facebook.

Shelley had moved to Tallinn in Estonia, in 2012 with his second wife, Greta, an Estonian, he sited the less hectic pace there to that he had spent the last thirty years in London. He died in Estonia of a suspected heart attack on the morning of 6 December 2018. His passing rightly made the national news as he had so much left to give and Buzzcocks were still very capable of delivering devastating live performances with so many hits they tried to pack into their live show they never disappointed.  The band were heralded by the likes of John Peel who was synonymous with playing their singles before they were released and helping turn the public onto Shelley penned classics.

 

Shelley left behind a quite remarkable catalogue of records spanning several decades five solo albums, fourteen singles as for Buzzcocks; there were nine studio albums, five live albums, no less than thirteen compilation albums, ten EP’s and twenty-four singles.  It’s hard to believe looking back that the band never achieved a top ten single in the UK when you consider some of their most memorable releases.

 

In celebration of their 40th anniversary, we’re pleased to announce the reissue of our third album, ‘A Different Kind of Tension’, and the ‘Singles Going Steady’ compilation on Friday 14th June.
Restored from their original tapes for the first time, both titles feature newly curated booklets and unseen images, with Jon Savage contributing the liner notes for ‘A Different Kind of Tension’ and Clinton Heylin for ‘Singles Going Steady’.
Pre-order on deluxe edition coloured vinyl and CD:Here

Hear the newly re-mastered versions of ‘Love You More’ and ‘You Say You Don’t Love Me’: Here

In other Buzzcocks news –
We can confirm the contemporary line up of Steve, Chris & Danny, original band members and guest vocalists will be performing at London’s Royal Albert Hall on June 21st 2019 for our Celebration of the Life of Pete Shelley performance.
We expect to start announcing our guest vocalists in the next two weeks.
Please join us for what will be a very special and unique evening.
tickets:  Here.