It’s been over a decade since I first discovered that even when Mommy Sez No you can still get your musical kicks from a trashy, crypt-cool beat combo souring airwaves with its self-soiled brand of “Spook ‘n’ Roll.”
From debut splatter platter, ‘Hotwaterburnbaby’, via the putrid poetry of follow-up, ‘Eeeeeeeeep!!!’, to the 2-4-5 Trioxin-addled new album, ‘The Dwellers Below’, the Saint Paul, Minnesota ghouls Mommy Sez No have traversed the gutters and gateways of the punk rock underground for so long that you’d probably be excused for thinking that this was a band destined to be stumbled across when lovingly fingering your wholly unfashionable physical media collection; the cobwebs blown from a disc or two decaying in the creepy corner labelled ‘Where Are They Now?’ But, no – this six-legged monstrosity (Jeff Arndt on guitar and vocals; Alex Smith on drums; Thomas White on bass) is back in the hunt; better, stronger, faster than it was before.
Okay, the enhancement might not be bionic, but it’s by some other ungodly advancement that finds the horror punk veterans kicking lumps out of the opposition with a thirteen-track (what else?!) long player that, actually, doesn’t play for that long given its frenetic pace, but oozes with a gooey, unexpected slap of, dare I say it, maturity.
Looking cooler-than-thou wearing its wraparound artwork skin courtesy of fellow Minnesota mayhem maker, artist Bill Hauser (creator of many a striking punk rock album cover), ‘The Dwellers Below’ takes the lowbrow splatter punk of Mommy Sez No out of the garage and into, well, at least the garage forecourt. With better production, better artwork, better just about everything to be honest, this is the band’s most accomplished work to date… but fear not horror punk purists, this record is still a wretched hive of scum and villainy.
From opening cut, ‘Take Me To The Hospital’, to the power ballad, ‘Maggots In Yer Guts’, via the chaos of ‘Hahahahahahaha’, Mommy Sez No is still as subtle as a killing spree and as manic as a final girl chase scene. The big difference is that the band doesn’t stumble at all throughout the entirety of this album.
Even when introducing more straight-ahead rock ‘n’ roll strut to the tracklisting with the likes of ‘Lil Bit Of Voodoo’, ‘Rock And Roll Death Patrol’ and the alternate reality KISS riff-led ‘Uh Oh… I Think…’ the band still has that unnerving way of making the listener feel like they need a good wash after partaking in an auditory exercise; the songs to die for (possibly literally) rather than a diversion.
The aforementioned artwork may give off a sense of the post-apocalyptic (doesn’t everything these days?!) but the album still has a hoof or two in the band’s tried, tested, and tortured peculiar amalgam of straight-to-video horror and no-budget punk rock… except there is a budget these days, but that shouldn’t put you off; think the upgrade from The Evil Dead to Dead By Dawn – better everything, but with that same, fierce independent spirit. ‘The Dwellers Below’ is a crazed, ass-kicker of an album that will easily force its way into my Top Ten albums list of a crazy, asshole of a year. Recommended.
Buy the album Here
Author: Gaz Tidey

Seemingly untouched by the global crisis as much as any passing trend, Billy Childish continues to swell his catalogue at an amazing rate. After CTMF’s ‘Last Punk Standing’, comes the first of four albums by his latest project, The William Loveday Intention. Yes; four albums, already in the can. Joined by James Taylor and Dave Tattersall, “People Think…” has the flavour of a western-themed record. The Medway Delta is augmented by tales from the saddle, while Billy’s voice remains firmly in the Kent marshlands.

 

The production is lush, as befits the ‘widescreen’ feel of most of the songs here. Violins and mariachi trumpets enhance songs like ‘My Love For You’, which has the richness of The Urban Voodoo Machine, while ‘Again And Again’ and ‘This Wondrous Day’ reminds me of Dan Sartain’s recent ‘Blue Prairie’ album, though I imagine that Billy has cast an influence on them already.

 

The richer sound suits the songs and the cinematic feel throughout, but there are still the Lo-Fi elements you’d expect; the insistent, monotone keyboard riff of the title track, which manages to name check Kylie Minogue, and the fiddle led lament of ‘The Bitter Cup’.

 

I’m guessing that it’s Julie singing on ‘You’re The One I Idolise’, though I don’t have all the details to hand. A sweet song that echoes some slower T Rex tunes. Then there’s the skeletal blues riff of ‘My Father Was A Railroad Man’, one of the oldest riffs, that John Lee Hooker must have heard as a child.

 

This is an interesting side-step from Billy, and bears repeated listens. What the next three albums will bring, only he knows, but this is very promising.

Damaged Goods Records

Buy ‘People Think They Know Me’ Here

Author: Martin Chamarette

If you were looking for a touring buddy or reference comparison for Dirty Fences I’d have to go for Los Pepes because both write upbeat, melodic, punk rock n roll songs that are full to bursting with catchy tunes and they churn them out with consummate ease or at least that’s how they make it appear.

 

This the third release from the NY combo is thirteen tunes from the recess of the Fences minds and something of a compilation of what they sum up as fondest memories and strange melodies and they’re not far wrong but the one abiding feeling I have after I play a Dirty Fences record or it crops up on a playlist is – Damn, what a tune and this is no exception from the runaway grinfest of the opening track and absolute Banger ‘Sid’ I’m lost in the music. But wait it’s not all bish bash bosh! as the laid back and a more dreamy affair that is ‘Kings Cross’ is nestled in neatly on side one. But wait the more ’80s inspired ‘Judy (Don’t Go)’ reminds me of an XTC melody even if XTC never sounded this daring or punchy.

Clearly The Bruddas are a big influence on bands all over the globe but the great bands that have some Ramones running through their DNA rather than ape Joey and co and you can add The Fences to the list of those who have some of that skill and craft in their DNA and touch on the melodies that Dee Dee might have penned and their influences are deeper like the acoustic-driven ‘Tommy & CC’.  There’s a great guitar lick workout going on via the down n dirty ‘High School RIP’  but I must admit to really liking the mellow Dirty Fences like ‘I’m Here’ just as much as the punk rock ‘n’ bop of ‘Teen Angel’ which just goes to make for a varied melting pot of Rock and Roll and yet another excellent release from a really really good band.  I know its only rock and roll but I love it! When the USPS sort themselves out I’m having myself one of those Mint Green Blob and neon purple splatter records they look awesome. That is if there are any left once the world catches on to some Dirty Fences.

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Author: Dom Daley

With a brand new box set ready for release we thought we’d catch up with Boys legend Matt Dangerfield and ask him about his time on Safari Records as we look back on the time the Boys went down to a four-piece and all things Safari. I also ask what’s next for one of the finest bands ever to come out of the United Kingdom.

 

How was it revisiting the Safari catalogue of releases?  Did it bring back fond memories?

Yes it did. Best of all was listening to the “Hell” tracks because this is the first time that it’s sounded good on CD. CDs didn’t exist when the album was released, and later when the first CD version came out it sounded like over-compressed shit. All subsequent CD releases of “Hell” were copied from that CD so I feel sorry for anyone who bought any CD copies of “Hell” prior to this release.

 

Were there any songs from the ‘To Hell’ record that you have since revisited during remastering changed how you feel about them? I’ll admit I’ve not played the records for a while and when the news came through about the box set I have since given them a good listening to and there are parts of songs that jumped out at me that I feel I previously missed or had forgotten.  Was this the same for you?

Very much so. For the reason I just mentioned, I couldn’t bring myself to listen to “Hell” on CD since the last century! So listening to it now for me is almost like hearing it for the first time and it all sounds fantastic from start to finish! We still usually include four of the songs in our live set: “Can’t Hurt a Memory”, “Terminal Love”, “See Ya Later” – and we use “Sabre Dance” as our intro music.

 

I loved reading your notes along with the specific song playing and was surprised to see you wrote lyrics on the way to the studio, and I chuckled at the thought of it happening due to studio time and schedules, etc did you not ever get worried you wouldn’t come up with anything?  Out of this process what would you say were your best lyrics?

Well, that was mainly in the early days when we weren’t given much studio time and I was working on two or three songs at a time. But generally speaking, I’ve always responded well to deadlines and would often leave things until they really need to be done and then work like Hell. There’s nothing like a deadline to focus the mind.

 

Your notes for ‘Waiting For The Lady’ and the Beatles reference I hadn’t really put it together previously but ‘Independent Girl’ has a real Lennon feel to it. Some of the harmonies throughout ‘To Hell’ have a certain Lennon and McCartney feel is that fair? They were obviously an influence but more so that album (Not that The Beatles would have sounded like you guys they weren’t that good) 😉

Flattery will get you nowhere, but thanks anyway! The backing vocals on “Waiting for The Lady” in particular, were Beatles inspired. But we were inspired by lots of bands and all the music that we grew up within the 60s which was a great era for musical creativity and innovation.

 

Who Owns The ‘Junk’ tapes now? How complete was the ‘Junk’ album? How does the process go with masters? If you didn’t own them the label did but they didn’t own the songs did they? If they weren’t finished,  Could you have gone away – changed a lyric here or a title there and released it anyway?  How involved were you with the day to day business of the band and management and label?

The ‘Junk’ tapes are just the rough monitor mixes on cassette from Rockfield Studios that I took away with me to work on ideas, lyrics etc. with the intention that we would come back and complete the album there. But after NEMS didn’t pay the studio and Rockfield wouldn’t release the two-inch tapes, we finally lost our patience with NEMS and went on strike for a few months until they eventually let us go. Our manager, Ken Mewis, generally dealt with the label, promotion and tour bookings, but we took care of the creative and recording side of things.

 

How do you look back on the time spent On Safari!?

We had a great relationship with Safari, which was basically John Craig and Tony Edwards. Two great guys who did all the right things for us in terms of albums, tours etc and generally looked after us and gave us the freedom to be creative. What more can you ask for as a band?

 

I always loved the cover of ‘Boys Only’  whose idea was that?

The designer was John Gordon (I fished out the original vinyl copy to get that detail) who was responsible for the concept. All I remember that it was our longest and most tiring photo session ever and took a whole day to get all the necessary pics.

 

Going out as a four-piece was it ever not going to happen?  Did you think around that time that the band was done? What about the recording process, how different was it?

It was different without Cas but we took it in our stride, I knew that the band wasn’t finished and it didn’t feel that much different playing live. Recording was as easy going as ever and John and myself were writing enough songs but we did have to work harder on the backing vocals and harmonies without Cas being there.

 

Would you say that John recording with Pete Stride made him a more confident writer and bandmember?  He brings quite a bit to the table for Boys only and sings on quite a few.  How did you decide who sang what?  are there versions recorded say of ‘Monotony’ with you delivering a vocal and Duncan or was that never done? because you say he (Duncan) sang it live.

Yes, John had become more confident and also had become a better singer. As regards who sang what, I usually only sang the songs that I’d written or written with Cas, and Duncan usually sang John’s and a few Steel/Dangerfield songs that we thought would suit his voice. I think “Monotony” was only ever likely to be sung by John on record.

 

You got to record in some iconic studios such as Rockfield, Pye and Olympic were you aware of your surroundings at the time?  Was there a favourite? or a particular song you look back on that you really nailed because of where you were.  Rockfield had the toilet at the end of the hallway with a mic in the hall did you ever apply such techniques?

Yes, I was definitely chuffed to be using the same studios where some of my favourite tracks had been made. Rockfield/Dave Edmonds/Sabre Dance; Pye/The Kinks etc; Olympic/lots of Stones stuff etc. Rockfield was probably my favourite for its vibe because you also lived there and could totally concentrate on the recording. “Brickfield Nights” was definitely ‘nailed’ there.

 

When the band gets back to playing live is there a chance some of the more obscure tracks might creep into the set?  You mention songs like ‘Little White Lifeline’ and its solo would sound great live.

We sometimes slip in a lesser known track. We do “Lifeline” at acoustic gigs sometimes but without the solo, because even straight after recording that solo, I was never able to play it again.

 

When you have writing credits say like on ‘Schoolgirls’ Cas yourself and John how do you decide who gets on the credits?

It’s usually decided on the spot – if anyone added anything of substance to the song they’d get credit.

 

Changing up songs like ‘Kamakaze’ in the style of VU for ‘Jap Junk’ whose idea was that and was this done on any other songs because it’s quite a departure the saxophone is great on the single mix

The minimalist drums were my idea of a tribute to the Velvets, who first opened my eyed to punk, and I think we’d always had it in mind to get a sax on the song.

 

How many more tapes might there be with the likes of ‘Cry Tomorrow’ on them? Fantastic stuff, maybe another acoustic album is on the cards with some of the rare tunes mixed with the more popular ones you did on the acoustic album. a live acoustic album recorded at Rebellion because a couple of acoustic sets were fantastic from the pubs almost acoustic stage and then the opera house were real highlights?

Well those tapes turned up out of the blue, so who knows what else might turn up. We may consider another acoustic album – it’s a lot easier to make than a full studio album, as is a live album.

 

The band always did great covers are there any you think would have really suited you guys?  Any you worked on that never got recorded?  The other side of it is other people covering The Boys.  Who have you particularly admired any jump out as doing a great job or really getting what the song was about?  Michael Monroe did jimmy Brown and it must always be great when Die Toten Hosen release a covers album and include a Boys Song.

I love Michael’s version of “Jimmy Brown”. I also like the Hosen’s versions of “First Time” and “Brickfield Nights”, and Nicky Sudden’s cover of “Independent Girl”.

 

The live album sounds fantastic,  I’ve always liked the BBC sessions, from some of my favourite bands possibly, because the BBC always had great engineers and their sound recording was top notch and the live ones always sounded so good what are your thoughts on the live album?

Yes, it’s true those Beeb producers and sound engineers were very good and worked very quickly, which really suited us as we generally record fast. I remember that the BBC sound people always seemed to have beards, maybe it was a job requirement.

You illude to it not being your usual audience.  The applause sounds great even after the ‘worm song’ their faces must have been a picture.

They were very polite.

I’ve mentioned it to Steve but it would be great to have these ‘Safari’ recordings as a vinyl set I wouldn’t need my glasses then for the booklet which is great to read your memories of each song.  Did you ever keep diaries or is it just a sharp knack for remembering.  What next for the Boys?  Is there anything left in the archive or what about new material.  ‘Punk Rock Menopause’ was such a great album is there going to be a follow-up?

We’d love to get them out on vinyl and a lot of our fans would love it so who knows?

 

 

“Anyone buying the Box Set directly from The Boys this month (September 2020) will be given a PDF document of Matt Dangerfield’s full Safari notes along with an unreleased 1979 demo of “New Guitar In Town”. For more information email The Boys at info@theboys.co.uk

Special thanks to Steve Metcalfe for always having The Boys corner and doing a sterling job keeping their flame alive and making running features on them such a pleasure.

TAKEN FROM NEW ALBUM, BLUE HEARTS,
OUT SEPT 25th ON MERGE RECORDS

 the latest single from his explosive upcoming album Blue Hearts, which arrives via Merge Records on Friday, September 25th. Pre-orders are available HERE.

Mould released this statement about ‘Siberian Butterfly’:

“The genesis of ‘Siberian Butterfly’ spoke to the notion of “collectors” — people with excessive means who gather the works of creative folk for their ego-driven portfolios.

“As I kept writing, the narrative shifted toward themes of change, growth, and freedom. These motifs are central to how we become our true selves. This is how we begin our journey toward our true identities.

“It’s autobiographical as well. I put myself through some self-hating years as a young gay man — never feeling “good enough”, not recognising the positive qualities I had to offer, while inhibiting the development of my gay identity.

“I hope for a world where all people can be what they want to be. Life seems shorter every day; maybe this simple song can be of use to people who are struggling to find their true selves.”


‘Siberian Butterfly’ is the third song released from Mould’s 14th solo LP, Blue Hearts – and follows the provocative first single ‘American Crisis‘ and the powerful second single ‘Forecast of Rain‘. Blue Hearts is the rawest and most confrontational work of Bob Mould’s four-decade solo career, a raging 14-track collection described by its creator as “the catchiest batch of protest songs I’ve ever written in one sitting.” Produced by Mould at Chicago’s famed Electrical Audio with longtime collaborator Beau Sorenson engineering, the album – which once again features backing from the crack rhythm section of drummer Jon Wurster and bassist Jason Narducy – nods to the veteran singer-songwriter’s groundbreaking past while remaining firmly planted in the issues of the day. Where Sunshine Rock captured Mould at his most “violently happy” (according to Rolling Stone), Blue Hearts is both seething and pointed, the raging yin to ​the previous album’s positive yang. Acoustic opener ‘Heart on My Sleeve‘ catalogues the ravages of climate change, while ‘American Crisis’ – written initially for Sunshine Rock but deemed “too heavy” by its writer – spits plainspoken fire at the people who fomented this catastrophic moment in history, while ‘Forecast of Rain’ questions the ethos of American community: “This love this neighbour thing: Does it apply to all mankind, or only those who fit neatly inside your narrow lines?”

Photograph Credit –  Blake Little Photography

Not everything is Black & White but in these strange times, it helps polarize your brain and when these Londoner’s plugin and turn it up with their sharp angular chords thrashed out with much anger and frustration along with some pissed off rhythms that embrace modern technology these post-punks seem to love hiding in the bleak grey corners of your mind and jump out with loud overdriven, often intense songs that lack any colour and do so with the intension of making everything seem just a little out of focus.

 

I get the impression Girls In Synthesis aren’t for compromising and their views are clear as daylight.  The politically charged and perfectly delivered ‘They’re Not Listening’ fits with the angst and rage of the times when politicians only work inside their own echo chamber and fuck the rest of us, never apologising for mistakes nor recognising when they might be wrong.  The delivery is at times in keeping with the likes of Sleaford Mods but the music is born from real instruments and not an apple mac book being Londoners I guess the concrete jungle has played a part in creating the music they play.  The sounds they create are aggressive, jarring and every void is filled to the brim.

They waste no time as they soundtrack the worst of times like a nuclear bomb going off ‘Arterial Movements’ could be what it sounds like in your head. from the frantic feedback being wrestled like a giant anaconda.  the chorus has gang vocals from a concrete bunker in response to the dry vocal its chaos but never is it too fucked up and it certainly gets the blood pumping.

It’s a pretty unrelenting album as well as uncompromising and it’s not until halfway when the pace eases up but not the tension as ‘Human Frailty’ is a moment for you to catch your breath. the solo is mental and the bleakness of the music is intense.

 

If you might think that side two is going to get any easier then forget it ‘Cause For Concern’ is pounding whilst that industrial concrete bass throb is on the attack on ‘Coming Up For Air’ which is a short sharp foray into carpet-bombing using the medium of audio.  Perhaps a bit out of step with the shorter songs you then get ‘Set Up To Fail’ with its five-plus minutes beginning with a cleaner sound reminding me of PIL meets crass as it gains momentum but never does take off preferring to ease back and hammer on with a more jazz vibe with the brass flittering around the speakers.

To close this one down there’s the buzz of ‘Tirades Of Hate And Fear’ with its flat delivery of the lyrics from a low chat in your ear it gets more and more intense before signing off.  Better to burn out than fade away for sure Girls in Synthesis deliver an album that will keep on giving and is totally in keeping with these strange times.  Post Punk, noisy, aggressive and digging you on the temple to shut up and just listen.  Check it out.

 

Buy Heres An Echo Here

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The break-up album can be an artist’s defining career moment. Time after time it has been proven that heartache and relationship breakdowns have fuelled the writing and inspired some of the greatest albums of all time. Whether we talk Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Rumours’, Nick Cave’s ‘The Boatman’s Call’ or Bob Dylan’s ‘Blood On The Tracks’, writing and recording music can be an exorcism of the pain, anger and confusion of a break-up. It has been said that when an artist is at their most vulnerable…they are at their best.

When Texan singer/songwriter Ryan Hamilton was faced with an unexpected divorce last year, he was a broken and confused man. He did the only sane/insane thing he felt he could do. He cut off his hair, packed up his troubles in the back of his car and took to the road with just an acoustic guitar and his dog Peaches for company. Travelling Route 66 and living in the back of his car, this time of solitude and soul searching was designed to ease the heartbreak and maybe help him find direction. Whether it made things better or worse, you would have to ask Ryan, but it certainly spawned new music and a new album.

 

Taking its title from one of Ryan’s heroes, Jack Kerouac, ‘Nowhere To Go But Everywhere’ is a trip through the mind of a man searching for answers and re-evaluating his life, to a soundtrack of radio-friendly Americana, backed by his transatlantic rock ‘n’ roll band. Recorded at his home studio in Texas and finished off back in the UK by his band and producer Dave Draper, this is a more introspective and emotional journey than we are accustomed to, from a man who deals in catchy, power pop ditties.

Opener ‘Only A Dream’ sets the tone with sweet acoustic guitars and Ryan’s even sweeter vocals. It has definite Tom Petty vibes as Americana marries dreamy, folk pop to perfection. Highlighted by swathes of keys and a rhythm section who know exactly how to take it where it needs to go. It builds nicely in the pre-chorus with great chord progression, to soaring vocals in the chorus. An emotive and harmony soaked introduction to the album.

Second track (and second single) ‘Oh No’ is a duet with Letters To Cleo singer Kay Hanley. Classic album titles make up pretty much all the lyrics in this clever celebration of musical influences. Upbeat and summery, this is more in the vein of what we know and love from the Texan songwriter. The juxtaposition of male/female vocals in the chorus is complete radio fodder. How many album references can you spot?

Yet, ‘Jesus & John Lennon’ is probably the most radio friendly single on offer. That “na-na-na-na” intro is an instant earworm, both euphoric and spiritual in equal measures. Co-written by Steven Van Zandt and featuring The Alarm’s Mike Peters on backing vocals, this could be the happiest sounding song about a break-up ever written. Referencing Brian Jones &The Rolling Stones and Martin Luther & the Catholic Church, it’s a break-up song about how some things were never meant to be.

 

The 11 track album feels like a journey, as we travel with Ryan through many emotions. From happy-go-lucky love songs such as ‘Out Of My League’ and Geordie anthem ‘Newcastle Charm’, onto the struggles of a religious upbringing and going back to the roots on the likes of ‘Can I Get An Amen’ and ‘Southern Accents’ respectively. Even though it is mostly upbeat, throughout there is a sense of yearning and heartbreak. It only hits home on the heartfelt ballad ‘Don’t Fall Apart’. Prime mixtape fodder for the girl you love, pedal steel gives a countrified, Americana vibe. A song overflowing with sentiment, as he sings the words of a man coming to terms with his whole world crumbling around him.

‘We Gave It Hell’ seems like the natural album closer. A goodbye and thanks for all the fish moment, as Ryan bids farewell to past love, and looks forward to pastures new to an accompaniment of pedal steel and understated percussion. Album closer proper ‘Pick Yourself Up’ seems like more of a reprise, as Ryan continues the theme of starting over accompanied by a lonesome piano.

It must be said that Dave Draper has done a great job of capturing Nashville vibes as he did on ‘Grand Ole Otley’, Ryan’s collaborative covers album with Terrorvision frontman Tony Wright. And as always the long time rhythm section of Rob Lane on bass and Mickey Richards on drums play their parts to perfection.

 

To avoid being consumed by the sadness of his marriage break-up, Ryan Hamilton has used songwriting as therapy and channelled his emotions into his art. This is not an angry album, it’s more of a cathartic look back over a failed relationship. Dissecting what was good and not dwelling on the bad, trying to figure out where it all went wrong and where to go from here.

As he bids farewell to one chapter of his life and looks forward to what the future brings, it seems through no fault of his own or any grand design, Ryan Hamilton has written a poignant and confessional album that could well be the best of his career.

Buy ‘Nowhere To Go But Everywhere’ – Here

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Author: Ben hughes

 

 

 

 

‘CLANG! Smiley Drops A Few’ is the brainchild work of Steve Barnard, better known (by everyone!) as Smiley! He is best known as a drummer, songwriter, producer, and owner of his own, Sunshine Corner, studios. Smiley has, over the past 25 years, played with a plethora of the great and good (and, sometimes, not so good) of the music industry. His CV is littered with artists such as, Robbie Williams, Joe Strummer, The Mock Turtles, From The Jam, The Alarm, and, Archive; to ‘CLANG!’ just six. ​This book is packed full of stories around many years of live shows, tours, TV, Radio, festivals , pub gigs, corporate events, and, often hilariously, weddings. It gives an amusing insight to life from inside the music industry, a view from the back of the stage, but also from the next door dressing room. There are, inevitably, highs and lows; but all are approached, and told, in Smiley’s own, inimitable, way. Smiley engagingly recalls stories connected to all sorts of showbiz luminaries, from Liam & Noel, Weller, The Who, The Foo Fighters, and The Chili Peppers; right through to encounters with Sting, Zoe Ball, East 17, and Peter Andre. One of the great joys of the book is the tongue in cheek style in which these stories are recounted. It’s not in any way boastful, but chock full of showbiz inspired anecdotes; hence the title, ‘CLANG!’. Everybody loves a name drop, and this book is stacked high in funny, and off the wall, stories. If you like a good old tale about a household name (and, let’s face it, who doesn’t?) then this is definitely the book for you.

 

It almost took as long to write in the Tags for this book as it did to rip my way through the pages such is the vast collection of Clangs Smiley drops.  I wouldn’t have liked to be the person carrying the bag of Clangs or picking them up every time he dropped one. The one thing you do try to get your head around is just how varied the people Smiley has sat in with its simply a staggering amount of folk and how the guy still manages such a huge grin is amazing.

 

C’mon we all love a Clang! I know I do and knowing about the guy’s musical history and having seen him play dozen and dozens of times over the years I found I was laughing out loud with every Clang and as I turned the pages had to check nobody was watching me chuckle or I’d have been committed to a special hospital.

 

Buy ‘Clang!’ Here

Governess are a sleazy bunch of sexy sailors playing a glunky blend of all action rock n’ roll that would bring a tear of pride to the guy lined eyes of Johnny Thunders and Happy Tom. Hailing from Buffalo, NY in the late great USA, Governess share the balls of their mid-west neighbours and the guts of their NYC cousins. We had a word with guitar player Handsome Erik, an all American guy with an unhealthy love for UK 90’s indie bands.

Compete the following sentence “Governess sound like a cross between………..”

A cross between deathpunk, glam, and Scandi/action rock.  Big riffs, flamboyant swagger, sick guitars, and one hand gripping your crotch.  Our influences include Hanoi Rocks, NY Dolls, Turbonegro, The Hellacopters, and the Dead Boys, to name a few, and I think that comes out in our musical style.

It’s been 4 years single the debut album “Let Me Be Your Governess”. What have you guys been up to????

Writing songs, and hitting the road, mostly.  Getting out there, grinding, playing shows has always been at the forefront of our minds.  We didn’t really want four years to pass before putting out another record; it just kind of worked out that way.  The luxury of taking that time gave us a lot of material to choose from – the best we have from the last four years!

You’ve just unleashed new tune “Grime Time” what’s the response been like?

Oh man, the response has been great! Choosing the first single is a tricky thing.  We wanted to put a song out that gives the audience an idea of what the record sounds like, but we didn’t want to blow our load early and use the strongest tune(s).  I think we made the right decision; the song rips, and there’s still plenty of gems on the record.  Every lyric in that song is true, by the way.  It’s about our best bud, and 6th Governess – “Grime Time,” Matt.  Without blowing his head up too much, he’s become some sort of quasi-fabled legend.  He travels with us, partying his ass off the whole time.  Once he learned that we wrote a song about him, shit really popped off!

What can the world expect from the new album “Never Coming Home”?

Never Coming Home sounds HUGE.  Don’t expect some weak-ass, lo-fi, art-punk crap that was recorded on an old mixtape, or something.  There’s a lot of guitars, a lot of sing-a-longs, cool lyrics, and upbeat songs.  No snoozers.  It’s dark, it’s fast, and it’s loud.  In a lot of ways, we feel like Let Me Be Your Governess was kind of like our Ass Cobra, and this new one is our Apocalypse Dudes moment.  The band has evolved so much in four years.

Have you got a label lined up or will you set up your own label to get it out there?

We are currently doing everything ourselves, but we are definitely looking to shop this around and get label support.

What’s your plan, post-pandemic battle plan?

Staying in lock-down has everyone really dying to get out play shows.  Once we’re able to do that again, we’ll be pounding the pavement hard.  This pent up energy is going to make for some wild times ahead!  We’re trying to get this record released, in physical form, by the end of the year/early 2021.  We haven’t discussed an early digital release, but that’s a possibility as well.

Are there still any great undiscovered bands out there? Give your mates’ bands a push.

Absolutely! Punk’s not dead, it’s just down on the floor…  Through the years, we’ve met some great bands, and have made some great friends. Without a doubt, the best band in our scene is Hot Blood, from Asbury Park, New Jersey.  If you’re into hardcore punk, there’s no one doing it better.  They have two guitar players that shred, their lyrics are on point, and their hooks are strong as fuck.   In early 2019 they put out Fear of a Unified Public, and we’re still all talking about it!  Another great Asbury band (now in Los Angeles) is The Battery Electric. These beautiful babies are the hardest working band in the business.  100% rock n roll, sweet hooks, and another Jersey guitar shredder!  I would be remiss if I didn’t mention Rotten UK (Rochester, NY) and the Cheats (Pittsburgh, PA).  Both bands are incredible and should be way bigger than they are.  I hear the Hot Blood guys a Rotten boys don’t get along, though….

What five albums should no home be without?

I find it curious that you’re asking for five records, and it just so happens that those first five Oasis releases are pure fire!  Coincidence???  For real though, my favorite bands/records change on a daily basis, depending on my mood, or what Kinks record I’m listening to at the moment, so this is a tough question.  How about I tell you the five records that are getting the most spins in the Handsome household?

  1. Greater Than Ever, by Baseball Furies – Buffalo punk legends. I discovered this record about two years ago, and its been in regular rotation since.  I’m mad at myself for not discovering it sooner.
  2. Off the Rails, by Gino and the Goons – I just discovered these guys too!  Their entire catalog is great.  I thought I was a huge Heartbreakers fan; these guys really love them, L U V!
  3. Funhouse, by The Stooges – This record blows me away. It’s so loud, raw, and loose. Plus Ron Asheton is fucking MENTAL!!
  4. Crystal Gazing Luck Amazing, by Compulsive Gamblers – I love that 60s vibe. The singer has a sweet voice, and that song Two Thieves always makes me want to cry. I DON’T THOUGH!!!!!
  5. Algorithm & Blues, by The Good, the Bad, and the Zugly – Jesus Christ! What can I say? Its not only the best record of 2019, but it’s going in the Deathpunk Hall of Fame.

Governess are –

Robot Rob: Vocals & Bass
Handsome Erik: Lead Guitar
Fast Teddy Clarke: Lead Guitar
Jon Swayze: Rhythm Guitar
Matty Wild: Drums

Hurl them some abuse on their Facebook page Here

Check out the latest single “Grime Time” Bandcamp

Catch up and grab their debut album “Let Me Be Your Governess Here

Author: Fraser Munro

 

Australian garage punk rockers MOOT have released their new EP ‘Cultural Treason’ via Riot Records. Cultural Treason is the first proper release from the band.

A collection of songs poking fun and inspecting what’s going on in the world today. It’s fast, chaotic and good fun would be the best way to describe this record as it blitzes round the genres of Punk and Garage Rock.

Cultural Treason is trashy garage punk rock and roll. Australia is easily caning the rest of the rock and roll world over the last couple of years and are churning out potential breakthrough acts left right and centre. A lot of the better ones are hedging their amps down the Garage sloppy punk n roll street.  Moot are on of the contenders or they bloody-well should be

I Hate Hippies is MOOT’s summary of the modern phenomena of hipsters. The one that puts on the “I’m in touch with the earth and wellness” schtick, but really, it’s just mummy and daddy financing a self-absorbed arrogant hypocrite. ITs spat out as you’d expect.

 

‘1000 Words’ is old school punk and if you close your eyes you could imagine this was recorded in a rehearsal down the Roxy.  There isn’t much finery going on in the control room and the band seem more intent on capturing the spirit of the music rather than keeping up with modern studio dynamics.   ‘Sick Dog’ sounds like they just found an early pistols jam as they try to harness that Jonesy guitar riff.

Six tracks sounds like a great idea for a first release and knocking it on the head with the single ‘I Want TO Be Clint Eastwood’ has the feel of Dead Kennedys but not as rapid, unlike the record’s opener.

 

In the bands six years existence, they’ve played every dive bar in Australia and lived to tell the tale with a smile on their faces lyrics that tackle serious subjects as well as with a cheeky wink and who doesn’t want to be Clint Eastwood its about time someone wrote a tune worth playing twice about the Actor.

 

Buy ‘Cultural Treason’ Here

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Author: Dom Daley