Today’s Introducing happen to be a new down & dirty garage/punk trio from London influenced by the likes of Jay Reatard, The Cramps, 80s Matchbox, etc.

Dead Horse formed in 2019 when former Love Buzzard (Fluffer/1-2-3-4 Records) front man Kevin Lennon (bass/vox) returned to London from Brighton, meeting up with long time bandmates (Rumour Mill/Kids From K Hole) Duncan Clark (drums) and Josh Kemp (guitar) via a mutual interest in garage rock/punk, old and new.

Who are Dead Horse?

Dead Horse are sleaze drippin garage punk trio. Kev Lennon on Bass/Vox, Josh Kemp on guitar and Duncan Clark on Drums.

Where you from?

All currently base in and around London

How did the band come together?
Duncan and Josh already had been in bands together for a few years, Kev joined them when he returned to London from Brighton after a stint as front man to Holy Glam FKA Scab Hand and before that Love Buzzard.
Recordings available? 

We have released one single ‘Flesh Mountain’ prior to the EP release. Kev recorded that one on an old cassette 4 track in our rehearsal studio so a bit rough around the edges in a good way!

Post pandemic what’s the plan?
Getting back into the studio in Bristol towards the end of the year to lay down another EP or possibly an Album depending on what we can squeeze out in 3 days. We are of course  looking forward to getting back to gigging and want to get a UK tour booked in as soon as we now when venues will be opening up again.

Hit them up on Facebook / Instagram and tell em RPM Online sent you!

 

Back in the old days, there were a few bands who responded well to being harrassed by some writers from this side of the pond and some who lurked in the underground punk rock scene consistently knocking out great punk rock and B movie videos. Recently one of those beasts reconnected with RPM and had some new music available so it seems only fair that we threw out a few questions to Anthony about just what Chesty Malone is up to? So here goes a quick chat whilst your waiting for the new album to drop…
Hi Anthony, What have Chesty Malone & The Slice Em Ups been up to lately?
We spent most of the spring and summer of 2019 playing east coast shows in support of our ‘Satanic Brooklyn Scum’ 7” that came out on April fool’s day this year. We played with Dr Chud’s solo band in Delaware, we headlined a record release show at Lucky 13 Saloon in Brooklyn where we had a satanic blessing just before we went on. We also played Philadelphia, PA, and Altoona and State College, PA plus a bunch more I’m currently not remembering hahaha, I think we made it somewhere in Ohio too. We also have a brand new 3 song 7” coming out on Friday the 13th in December, ‘19. It’s called ‘Destroy All Humans’ and it’s gonna be on green, purple and black wax on 1332 Records. We also have upcoming shows in Brooklyn where we’re opening for Poison Idea’s final show along with our first ever shows in Pittsburgh, PA and Baltimore, MD and more!

For those new to the band can you give us a potted overview of who you are and what brought you together?
We formed in 2006 in the very depths of Queens, NY. We (Anthony Van Hoek and Jaqueline Blownaparte) were both heavy in the NYC Punk and hardcore scene and we decided to come together to bring back a more extreme old school feel. Music wasn’t our only influence, lots of B movies, Coors Light and hanging out with cool cats (the animals, not the people) inspired our new brand of sound. We like to express our love of those things and our feelings of disgust with society and people around us. Have you ever wondered what it’d be like if the OG Misfits played a VFW show with Metallica, the Cramps, the Plasmatics, the Stooges, Venom and some Las Vegas Strip club bands from the ‘50s while a Twilight Zone marathon played between bands with a white female Dolemite MCing the whole shabang? Well, wonder no more.
The East coast around the New York area especially has been such a creative centre for great Rock and Roll? what memories have you got of getting into punk rock?
My very 1st punk rock memory is probably when my uncle Allen brought the 1st Ramones record over to our house one summer when I was about 7 years old. That made a huge and indelible impression on me for sure. The east coast is great but we still wanna make it out west one day too!
Who influenced the sound of Chesty Malone?
I mean, life in general hahaha. Walk down the street behind a bunch of inconsiderate a-holes who don’t realize there are other people trying to use the sidewalk and you can get influenced by that for sure. Be a bouncer at a biker bar in New York City where you have to listen to the same country and classic rock tunes every night for years on end and that will inevitably sink into your soul. Ride the subway every day of your miserable life alongside rats, roaches and every form of assorted degenerate the world has to offer and, well you guessed it, huge influence! Sure I could name some bands we like but that’d be a bit boring and you can probably draw some conclusions on your own anyway.

 

You have a new record on the way what are the chances of a long-player? What about live shows?
We are currently writing and rehearsing for a new full-length album, thanks for asking! I’ll even give ya a scoop: it’s gonna be called “Please Chesty Don’t Hurt ‘em” and we’re always playing shows! Comin’ at ya live!
What about 2020 any plans for the band?
Well yeah! We’ve got the ‘Destroy All Humans’ 7” coming out at the end of 2019 so we’ll be shamelessly hawking that hot slab ‘o wax along with ‘Satanic Brooklyn Scum’ and all our other stuff all year. Maybe our 4th album that I mentioned above will come out in 2020. Unless something terrible happens of course. 
On to you personally, What or Who made you pick up the guitar in the first place?  From the scene that you started out in who are still kicking about?  I’ve seen some cool footage of shows from places like Coney Island they always look like a lot of fun and a great community? where has everyone gone or are they still around?
Yeah, it’s more of a WHAT that made me want to play the guitar. I’ve always loved the dirty heavy sound of a loud distorted guitar. Literally from the scene, I started out in, I can only think of the band Slough Feg that’s still around. Look ’em up if ya don’t know.
Your videos always look like a load of fun some great B movie humour going on where do you get your ideas?
Thank ya! I sometimes wake up in the middle of the night with video concept ideas and song ideas and artwork concepts etc. I keep a notebook and pen by my bed for these purposes.
There you go, folks, a quick catch up with our Favourite Queens punk rockers check out the videos and go listen to their tunes stream them or pop along to one of the links provided and pick up an old school record – they rock!
The label’s site, where you can order the new record
All photos by Rusty Glessner

Nick Knox, the drummer with the Cramps from 1977 until 1991, died at the age of 60,  (born Nicholas George Stephanoff; March 26, 1953).

He was the band’s longest-serving drummer and appeared on their biggest selling albums including 1986’s ‘A Date With Elvis’. Knox died of Cardiogenic shock (which is a condition in which your heart suddenly can’t pump enough blood to meet your body’s needs) on 15th June 2018.

Knox played drums for proto-punks the Electric Eels before joining Lux Interior and Poison Ivy Rorschach in the Cramps.  He played on ‘A Date With Elvis’ – which was the band’s most commercially successful album. It followed 1980’s ‘Songs the Lord Taught Us’ and 1981 follow-up ‘Psychedelic Jungle’. Knox’s final recording was, 1990’s ‘Stay Sick!’ before his departure.  The band extensively toured Europe under Knox’s watch and hes regarded as being the glue that pulled the Cramps sound together.

After retiring from The Band Knox didn’t surface until he appeared on stage with The Pagans in 2003and it wouldn’t be until 2017  when he was credited as “senior advisor” to the Cleveland-based punk band Archie And The Bunkers in 2017.

After his passing Knox had some wonderful testimonials from his peers such as his predecessor Miriam Linna, the Cramps’ drummer Knox replaced, She Said she’d visited Knox in the intensive care unit in Cleveland. She added, “I thank God that Nicky was a friend of mine. He was one of the kindest, funniest, most amazing human beings ever and I was very lucky to have been in his orbit.”

On his passing Former guitarist Kid Congo Powers tweeted, “Nick Knox Coolest of the cool. R.I.P. Glad to have played to your boss Beat. Meet you on the mystery plane.”

 

On a happier note  RPM favourite, Noddy Holder was born on this very day in 1946. Noddy went on to front The UK’s most successful singles band of the ’70s scoring 17 consecutive top 20 hits and six No.1’s impressive legacy by anyone’s standards.  Neville John Holder was born in Walsall, West Midlands.  Sadly Holder isn’t interested in joining his ex-bandmates for any shows and prefers to spend his time hosting radio shows and acting.  What would we give to hear him belt out a Slade tune with Jim, Dave, and Don.  We can but hope, anyway, Happy Birthday Noddy.

Also sharing his birthday on this day is current Wonder Stuff Bass player Mark Gemini Thwaite (born 1965) ordinarily known as a guitarist of the six-string variety Mark is standing in on Bass for shits and giggles according to Hunt and on the recent tour the band has never sounded so good largly down to the fantastic musicians in the current line up. 

The list of artists Thwaite has recorded and toured with is incredible – The Mission, Tricky, Peter Murphy, New Disease, Spear of Destiny, Theatre of Hate, Mob Research (with Paul Raven of Killing Joke), Canadian band National Velvet and he recorded with Gary Numan, Al Jourgensen of Ministry, Revolting Cocks, Roger Daltrey of the Who, P.J. Harvey, Alanis Morissette, Primitive Race(with Chuck Mosley of Faith No More), Ricky Warwick of The Almighty, Ginger Wildheart, Stan Lee of Marvel Comics, Franz Treichler of The Young Gods, The Wonder Stuff, Ashton Nyte of The Awakening, Burton C. Bell of Fear Factory, Laurence “Lol” Tolhurst and Porl Thompson of The Cure and Ville Valo of Finnish band HIM. And breath; Mark has kept himself busy to say the least and landed himself some exceptional jobs with a whole variety of cool bands. Happy Birthday, Mark!

Another day another twist on a genre.  It seems like Scandinavian Rock or as it’s now known ‘Action Rock’ encompasses a much wider net than a few Northern European countries. Within that genre of Rock ‘N’ Fuckin’ Roll you can pretty much squeeze the likes of Gluecifer, Hellacopters, Turbonegro, Zeke, The Hives, Streetwalking Cheetahs, New Bomb Turks, The Dragons, Electric Frankenstein, The Hip Priests, Bitch Queens, Scumbag Millionaires and a host of other great bands, man its all just a name anyway even if we do all obsess a little on tags and narrowly defined tastes. Strap on a guitar adhere to the belt buckle rule and turn that amp up!
One band that doesn’t seem to get the respect in the wider community or is held in such high regards would be “Demons”.  Sure those that know; just know, with a little diggin’ around this here web you can pretty much get a handle on whos who and “Demons” will be a name that gets mentioned time after time after time. They were there at the birth of a scene and have ticked along throughout making some fantastic records along the way.  Sure they might have veered off the highways a little and even gone on hiatus but with a recent mini-album recorded with Jeff Dahl maybe the time has come to reclaim their crown and along with Hellacopters they should get the coverage they deserve. With a new album ready to drop  “Demons” are most definitely back on track so here at RPM we decided to throw some questions at Mathias Carlsson and get the lowdown on who the hell are “Demons” and what going on? Might I suggest you sit back and relax because this is a long one…
OK, Mathias, We might as well take it right back and for those who don’t know anything about the band when did “Demons” start? You recorded your first album back in ’95 right? 
The seeds were sown pretty early and the roots of the band, in fact, go back to the late ’80s when we were kids growing up in a northern suburb to Stockholm. I wore my first Pistols pin to school in the fifth grade, from then on I was determined to start playing. One way or another. I started the band Rabieshundarna with Stefan Jonsson and some friends from school and we helped build a rehearsal space at or nearest youth centre as a community project. We didn’t have a clue how to play but we got a lot of help from the staff at the centre, they being musicians themselves. My dad gave me my first guitar and from then on we were all set to go.
At that time all the rage was MTV, hip hop, AOR and hair metal but underground music was a real factor as well. To take part back then you had to go to shows in semi-illegal clubs, buy independently produced records and tapes and read fanzines to know what was going on. Nothing of it was exposed via media or other official channels. Apart from buying lots of punk rock records the bands that really gave us the inspiration to find our initial musical style was The Nomads (which I first saw in 1986) and actually a great band from Gävle called Los Bohemos who were amazing live. We were very impressed by them. Stefan and I tried to catch them every time they went to Stockholm. We also got exposed to what was left of the Swedish punk movement with hardcore, post-punk, käng (d-beat) and the burgeoning death metal movement.
After a few years, we had learned to play and Micke Jacobsson was sitting behind the drums. We took the name Jawbation and started playing gigs, mostly local but also in other cities. At that time we had discovered the 60’s for real and tried to combine Nuggets style psychedelia with hardcore punk, heavily inspired by Union Carbide Productions. We also caught the ear of the A & R guy who discovered Carbide. Unfortunately, nothing came out of it and no records were released (although we got asked to be on a few compilations).
The group as it was back then had been a very tight band of brothers growing up together quite rough and when the bass player decided to leave in 1994 we realized we wanted a fresh start and a fresh sound.
Muffins Brink came on to help us record bass on a couple of songs and with that “DEMONS” was born. We recorded another bunch of tracks in the summer of 1995 which were supposed to be released as a whole album. No one was willing to release it however but a couple of songs ended up on a few compilations. It might actually see a release in its entirety sometime this year.
What was the “Scene” like back then? Places to play like-minded bands playing clubs etc. 
In the early ’90s there was no scene at all and we felt pretty alone with our style and influences. We actually went out to try to find bands like us to start something but no one cared about The Stooges, MC5, New York Dolls and music like that in those days. The punk scene was very radical and rock’n’roll was not a part of that music anymore. I remember going to punk clubs with homemade Stooges buttons and no one knew who they were. That proto-punk, early punk thing was largely forgotten for some reason. At the time I found it tragic that the punks had forgotten or rejected their roots and I was determined to change that. Our mission became to put rock’n’roll back into punk rock.
The Stockholm scene that we became part of started to finalize around 1994, 95. It was very small and centered around a few friends, bands and venues. Those who were going in a similar musical direction was first us and The Robots then The Hellacopters, The Turpentines and a couple more. The guys from Nomads became like the big brothers to all of us and shared their experience and knowledge. We all played the small clubs, Hyndans Hörna, Kafe 44, Studion, Tuben, Blue Funky for each other and maybe opened up for slightly bigger bands who went through town. That’s how the Stockholm scene evolved. No one had an album out so the only way you can hear the new bands was live or on an occasional single. It was a small but lively scene.
Is it true that Lux and Poison Ivy came up with the name “Demons”
Well, I met Lux and Ivy on the Flame Job tour to interview them for a magazine I was working for in ´94. They were a bit weary from doing interviews all day. When I entered the room Lux commented on my New York Dolls shirt and everything lightened up. They gave me a great interview and at the end I told them I was starting a punky rock’n’roll band and needed advice on the name. They were very helpful and meticulously went through the list I had. Both of them had a short discussion and agreed that Demons was the best choice and that was that. Most of the interview time was spent discussing music and records. They really seemed to enjoy talking to a fellow rock’n’roll fan instead of clueless music journalists.
Is the fact you turned down major labels to retain control true? That’s a brave step for any band especially one trying to make a name for themselves.  
Yes, definitely. There were no major majors though. Maybe one. Mostly sub-labels and so on. People who had worked with majors and starting their own labels or something similar you know.
For us, in the beginning, the whole point of playing music was to serve as an alternative to everything we hated about big label rock, poseurs and people who desperately and willingly would do anything to be famous or what is conceived as cool by those who are not. While most bands steered towards that lifestyle and seemed to want to end up like rock stars and play stadiums we wanted to go our own way.
We almost religiously detested what the industry did to music and was quite radical in our beliefs that music belonged on the streets and to those who played it.  We viewed punk rock as our folk music, philosophical saviour and were no tourists of the genre. It might sound forced and naive to those who weren’t there. I assure you it was nothing naive about it if you were a teenage musician in Sweden in the early ’90s.
Right from the start, we wanted to be a vessel for the true spirit of rock’n’roll, an undiluted blast of punk rock with true do-it-right-or-die honesty and attitude. We had nothing to hide and were proud to stand up for it. We would rather had died than mess that up. Everything else was secondary to us. Some people might have misunderstood this for posing, but those who knew where we came from and understood what we wanted to do gave us their full respect. That was the only thing that mattered to us. We never really steered away from that philosophy even though we’ve seen all aspects of the music business by now. I think that was what really set us apart from other bands from the beginning.
In the US I was accused by some journalist of trying to sound like Eric Davidson (New Bomb Turks) on the Stockholm Slump album. That was purely unintentional. Sure, we were inspired by them but so was everybody around that time. They took inspiration from all of us as well and took time to record portions of their album ‘At Rope’s End’ in Sunlight Studio with Tomas Skogsberg. I was there in the studio with them.
I have all the respect in the world for Eric (I helped him out with some facts, flyers and stuff when he was doing the Scandinavian part of his book) but my vocal style around that time was a product of what I was listening to. What I was trying to combine was rockabilly techniques and with heavy inspiration from rhythm and blues singers like Frankie Ford and Carl Gardner of The Coasters delivered with hardcore intensity. Then, of course, ‘Raw Power’ era Iggy was a big inspiration. In hindsight, some 17 years later, I do sound a bit like Eric and I guess that can only be explained by the fact that we had the same influences.
To those who still think I copy Eric on that record I say, sure, it’s a tribute to one of the best punk rock singers and frontmen ever.
what type of worries did you have at the time were there any pressures put on you from big labels? 
If someone wants to work with you it’s a big compliment. Nothing to debate there. We have quite regularly through the years been approached by labels of varying size, producers and other people of the business. Naturally, you are extremely thankful for that. We never tried to act like rock stars and treated everyone with decency and respect. There was never an offer we didn’t consider and spent lots of time discussing. Most every one boiled down to the same thing though: they wanted the material for a minimal cost and all the rights for basically nothing without any promises or, for us, valuable commitments on their end.
Last time we went through this they also wanted a percentage on merch, shows and graphics. I just got up and left that meeting. It was an insult.
But there is a price to pay as well. Especially if you don’t play by the rules in the music business. That business will lash back at you. As a band, we weren’t really prepared for that but it has become apparent over the years. We’re still a pretty obscure band, especially in Sweden ironically. Turning down people from the business definitely had a lot to do with this. We have this huge body of work and no mainstream publication in Sweden will acknowledge that. It’s weird when you think about it.
“DEMONS” rarely gets mentioned or respected even though we’ve done a whole lot for Swedish music abroad, been around for twenty some years, toured the world and made a whole lot of records. It seems we are truly the underdogs and black sheep of Scandinavian rock. We never wanted that label, we just wanted to do our thing you know. Now we have become some sort of obscure legends with a pretty big legacy.
I think we have claimed our own corner in rock’n’roll though. And we’re pretty much Sweden’s dirty little secret.
were there things you didn’t like about the band’s existence when on Gearhead? It must have been a tough decision for the band to take at the time were you all united on how you wanted to proceed? Was it difficult being signed to a label so far away? Looking back are there any regrets?  Do you think you would / could have done things differently? 
At the end of the 90’s Mike LaVella and Gearhead were searching high and low for a band who understood and combined the radical attitude of punk with modern high energy rock’n’roll. Mike was all ready a veteran of the California hardcore scene and if it wasn’t with a 100 percent punk attitude he wouldn’t have touched it. When he found us he realized we were not only what he was looking for, we fit perfectly into the modern (and classic) California hot rod movement with our greasy hair and street gang qualities. After all, the whole point of his magazine (which the record label was an extension of) was to combine all that. Therefore we became the perfect band for them and the scene that was growing on the east coast. It was a perfect match and we could do nothing wrong in Mike’s eyes. During our first tours and albums, it was a great situation for us.
At the time we had almost signed with People Like You Records out of Germany. Even though Gearhead was just starting up Mike convinced us to go with them. The notion of touring in the states was an attributing factor to our choice and for a few years, we went coast to coast playing many shows. Who wouldn’t want to do that? We had a great time in the beginning and Gearhead and “Demons” were the greatest match. Everything worked almost like a clock. Mike was very idealistic and told us we would be booted off the label if we ever were caught doing drugs, haha.
During those years we had a blast and experienced a lifetime of stuff. It was like being in the middle of a road movie. Hell, I’m still digesting half of it. I regret nothing about it. Definitely not.
The whole Gearhead era ended on a bad note however. But these things always do. The best thing is just to move on with what you want to do. We had recorded basics for a third full lenght studio album for them but when we parted ways it was never finished and stayed unreleased.
Do you think as time went on and the internet became more widely used it was empowering for the band and the world became a smaller place?
For music and bands, it has been great. These days you hardly remember how it felt, dying to get a hold of a song or wanting desperately to hear a record. It’s all there. What is weird though is that it has become some kind of a “like” competition. It’s like a new digital currency. Bands compare and chase likes all the time and can be elitist with these things. Unfortunately, the business picks up on that as well. When we took our break, in 2011, streaming was picking up as well as the like phenomenon. We were out of that circuit for about four years and kind of missed out on the promotion possibilities.
Personally, I think that it’s pretty pathetic that some labels, bookers and venues judge bands for how many likes they have. They should get in there for real and get dirty, not sit at home by their computers and see who won the days Facebook like competition. A band should be judged for what they can achieve in the studio and on stage, not how many likes they have on their recent post on FB or whatever. I understand that it is a question of visibility as with any advertisement or promotion. But as with all social media it gets obsessive and unhealthy very fast.
Then it seems like the availability of everything has had the opposite effect on certain, dare I say younger people. We have had problems with two other Demons who never bothered to check if the name was taken. Either they didn’t know how to navigate the internet or either they didn’t care. That’s some serious disrespect right there. It’s a mystery to me why you would do that. Music is about all about creativity and taking someone else’s name doesn’t make you look very creative does it?
Do you think being DIY has been good for your music have you learned things that have benefitted the band as a result that you otherwise wouldn’t have picked up? 
All I can say is that if you have some kind of talent, good idea or something similar, don’t be tempted to sell yourself short. Your music or art should be a product of you, not a label, producer, reality TV show or advertising company. Most business people just want to make some quick bucks off of you while you’re on your way through life. They don’t give a rat’s ass if they destroy everything you have worked for up to that point.
If you’re lucky you might meet someone within the industry who shares your passion, wants to be in on the ride, understands what you’re doing and wants to be a part of whatever future lies ahead. But that’s a rare thing.
With that said there are of course other aspects to this: survival, funding, change, knowledge, progress et cetera. What I mean is that the reason you do what you do has to be number one. Keeping your back straight, not taking it up the ass and being honest to yourself is what D.I.Y. is to me. It’s hard and maybe the real devil-at-the-crossroads situation. Especially when you are poor and someone shows up with a bag of change and whatnot trying to buy the shirt off your back.
Did being a DIY band galvanise you do you think? Make you more determined?
When we started out music saved us from a lot of grief and trouble. Punk rock was our Jesus in that respect, haha. If I wouldn’t have started playing at an early age I might have ended up a lesser person or even dead or in prison. Lots of kids my age and from the same place did. “DEMONS” sure have experienced the coldness of the industry, no understatement there, but we will try to find ways to play and release records regardless of how the business regards us. Being outsiders hasn’t deterred us from doing our thing.
Being D.I.Y. doesn’t mean that we are hard to work with or that we’re not still searching for that person or persons to work with within the music business. On the contrary, it means that we’re a band that can just do that: everything ourselves. That’s a huge advantage, strength and showcases extreme ambition. More ambition that most artists can muster. That pretty much defines determination in most books.
Is it easier making records now than when you first made a record?  Are your demands different as you’ve gotten older and wiser:)? 
If you go back ten years or something there were only a few certain ways you could record your music. The alternatives were fewer and it was sort of the end of the big studio era. For those years we used studios and spent huge amounts of money we didn’t have on recording. The sound and end result was always in the hands of someone else.
With ‘Scarcity Rock’ we wanted to experiment with studio techniques combining different styles of recording and try to learn how to get back to basics with microphone techniques rather than using too many channels. That was very educational and opened up a different philosophy to the whole recording process. After that record, I decided I wanted to learn most of that process myself and started buying some decent microphones and stuff.
These days we have a totally different approach to recording. Especially since our bass player Tristan (since 2005) quit last year. We write a bunch of songs and when they feel ready we record the basics in a real studio, like drums, bass, whatever we have time to do. Then I take the tracks to my own studio and complete them myself. When we need songs for records we take them back to the same studio to get them mixed. It might seem more complicated but in the end, it’s little about time and money but mostly about creativity. At my studio, I can experiment with sound and find and capture the true potential of a song and be creative with it. It’s a situation I have wanted all my professional years as a musician.
You recently did the EP with Jeff Dahl how did that come about? you play some shows with him right? 
Jeff Dahl is a rare bird who has a big heart that beats for rock’n’roll. I challenge you to find a more dedicated, real and ambitious artist than him. Nothing has ever stopped him from doing his thing. You could always rely to him to manage the legacy of bands like The Stooges, New York Dolls and so on when no one else cared for that type of music. He has helped preserve that corner of rock’n’roll and kept it alive. People really should be aware of that. There was a time, in the late ’80s, early 90’s when Jeff and his music were one of few bright lights. His approach as an artist is very similar to ours. We have a lot in common both musically and philosophically. He has always been a true inspiration to us.
Jeff and I have been pen pals since our first 7″, which he gave a favourable review in his fanzine, Ultra Under. When time came for him to travel to Sweden again, mainly for intellectual reasons, we wanted to squeeze some rock’n’roll into his visit as well. He chose some songs and we rehearsed them before he came over. I wrote the song Mean Street Beat which he contributed the bridge to. Then we did one show in Stockholm. It was sparsely advertised and maybe 40 or 50 lucky people showed up. It’s already legendary.
The day after we headed into the studio to get the record done. Most of it was done more or less live with minimal overdubs. I took the recording to my studio and made some additional overdubs and stuff. Then it was mixed and mastered. Just a great experience all together. It was a true privilege to work with him on the record. We had a great time and it shines through in spades.
As a kid, I first heard Two Headed Dog in his version and discovered Roky Erickson soon after thanks to Jeff. I really wanted to do a Roky song for this record but we never got around to do it. Maybe next time.
And the split you did with The Hip Priests was a great match up what about some dates in the UK maybe with the Hip Priests who have a new album ready to go.
The Hip Priests approached us to do that one. We are really thankful to them because things snowballed a bit for us because of that record. Plus it became a great single. Their version of Hot Runnin’ Blood is so great. I love what they did to it. Without that record. I don’t think we would have been as active in 2018 as it turned out. They sort of reintroduced us to our own scene weirdly enough.
We have been talking about doing a UK tour with The Hip Priests and I am really looking forward to their new album. As it turns out we’re label mates as well now. At least in Canada.
How did you find touring America those looked like great matchups you guys with The Nomads and Fleshtones and then New Bomb Turks and Datsuns.
(It was The Dragons we toured with Stateside. Datsuns opened up on some of the shows on The Hellacopters farewell tour when we played with them.)
Touring the States was , of course,a dream come through. It was very tough though, especially the first time. We had gotten used to a certain standard in Europe and that was luxury compared to the US. Sometimes it was extremely far between the venues, food was always okay but sometimes we didn’t have anywhere to sleep. Then and again someone took us home and gave us beer and a place to crash for a few hours. Americans are great that way. Very helpful. Someone will always lend a hand. Even so ,we stood without accommodation on a few occasions. Those days were just crashing anywhere, sleeping in the car or not at all.
I fell asleep in a car i New Orleans with open windows at one time. Lucky I didn’t get killed, hehe. Vaguely I remember sleeping in an attic under an American flag and once in a coffin someone had in their house. Weird memories..
At one time we ended up at this guys house (wont tell you who) and he played us rehearsal tapes with The Stooges recorded on reel-to-reel from the time around Fun House. The tapes have never been released in any form and as an old fan it was an amazing experience to get to hear that.
The second tour we were put together with The Dragons from San Diego. They were the perfect ambassadors to the road life in the USA, toured all the time and knew every trick in the book. I guess it was the most fun tour we did over there. Hanging out with those guys was amazing. Not did they only show us the real, dirty underbelly of punk rock’n’roll America, they also showed us how to become a great live band. We learned a lot from them.
Eventually, they got signed to Gearhead as well. I guess we demanded they should be signed to the label. They just got out of some contract if memory serves me well. We had a couple of fingers in getting New Bomb Turks signed as well. No doubt about that. For a while, Gearhead had the greatest roster in the history of punk rock. “DEMONS”, Dragons, New Bomb Turks, The Hellacopters, The Hives, Turbo A.C’s, Riverboat Gamblers..
Touring with the New Bomb Turks was also great. We always pulled pranks with the bands we traveled with and at Bottom of the Hill in San Francisco we rented gorilla suits and hit the stage. Just as Elton John did with Iggy. The idea came from that. I think it was during their version of Mr. Suit. It was meant as a joke but I think Eric got genuinely scared because of some incident we didn’t know of. I remember Micke stage diving while his the head of his costume turned backwards. He was totally blind, mid air..
Mike LaVella was in on the prank we pulled on The Dragons. Mario always wore that “Who the fuck is Mick Jagger” shirt Keith had. Mike printed a few shirts with the text “Who the fuck is Mario Escovedo” which I wore at our show with them at the Casbah in San Diego. Mario was not that amused however, haha.
Our first headlining tour followed and it is by far the most intense and crazy tour we have ever done. Everything happened, we got robbed of all our gear, played motorcycle hangouts where everybody fought, even the women, got booted off Gearhead (not for doing drugs though) got lost in the desert and was held at gunpoint. That’s just the beginning of it. There’s a great live recording from the Crocodile Lounge in Seattle where the crowd chants “burn down the club” after the show since we weren’t allowed an encore. We hope to release that some day soon.
At the end we had met everybody from the Commodores to Jello Biafra, hardcore legends came out to see us, T-Model Ford opened up for us in Baltimore of all places, we got our kicks on Route 66, got seriously fucked up and never missed a show. It was great fun, chaotic, but great fun.
There are lots of stories and they would sure fill up a whole book.. Even though it was back breaking work it was an amazing experience all together.
There seems to be some great festivals in Europe featuring a lot of good bands like Hellacopters, Nomads, Turbonegro like Helldorado recently sadly not in the UK.  Is there a good appetite for high energy rock n roll in Sweden right now?
The surge for high energy rock’n’roll is coming along for sure again. There are a couple of rocking underground bands here but almost none of them are playing much in Sweden. The industry here will never accept rock’n’roll music in any form. Only if any band gets infamous or so. Media will never cover an underground band just to help out a scene or something like that. That just wont happen. Being independent has no value in Sweden. It’s more on a grass roots level.
Although we just got added to the Garage Rock Day 2019 with Electric Frankenstein headlining. It  takes place in Stockholm on the 25th of May. That, and last years Drenched in Beer festival will hopefully lead the way and make more venues interested in this type of music.
Being from the UK there was a big explosion back in the day from Scandinavia of really cool bands at a time when the UK music business was busy eating itself and there wasn’t a massive amount happening and we saw some of the bands hit our shores and I know it took off and we had some pretty good tours  from the likes of Backyard Babies, The Hellacopters, Gluecifer, Turbonegro, The Hives and Randy as well as other bands like and D4 and Datsuns (although not from Scandinavia they toured the UK at the time) off the top of my head, what was it like in Sweden at the time because obviously, you guys would have been friends right? Did it seem like things were happening or was it just isolated bands or were we getting a distorted picture? 
We toured the UK back then. Played with local bands as well as The Dirt Bombs, Moldy Lemon and more. Great times!
In Sweden, everybody hooked up with everybody in those days. Often touring bands slept at friends houses or apartments. It was intertwined in all sorts of ways you wouldn’t believe. People had parties and sometimes we would be at Nicke’s (from The Hellacopters) listening to records by the new bands on Crypt, Estrus or Sympathy. I live in a small apartment and at one time members of The Hellacopters, Entombed, Turpentines, “DEMONS” and some more people crowded my small living room partying and listening to records. I remember trying to convince Nicke to get into ska (as he liked rhythm and blues) and gave him a rare Skatalites record.
One of my best friends, Odd from The Robots (known to Hellacopters fans as the originators of Sign of the Octopus) frequently would put up Happy Tom in the independent days, They are still good friends I guess. We were hanging out with everybody coming through town. Zeke, New Bomb Turks, Queens of the Stoneage, Powder Monkeys, Chris Bailey, Guitar Wolf, you name it.. Everything centered around a record store called Freak Scene where Robban from The Hellacopters worked at one time. Freak Scene also released their second single along with a bunch of other cool stuff.
The place we usually took bands was Kvarnen on Södermalm in Stockholm. We rehearsed there in the basement together with The Nomads (who got us in), Bob Hund, The Cardigans and Atomic Swing. Robban Strings Dahlqvist’s first band, Silvermachine, were there as well. Legend said David Bowie had rehearsed there once for a show and Lou Reed also.
It was a very interesting era. Of course, the area is gentrified now and most of those hang outs are gone. Somebody bought Kvarnen, kicked everybody out and converted the basement into an orange tile covered bar where they played house music. Nothing really wrong with that. Guess it’s progress. All though It should have been converted to a museum instead with all that cuture going on.
We heard all sorts that you guys would have grants out of high school if you started a band and stuff like that we used to joke that every child in Sweden was given a high school pack that contained some creepers, a leather jacket a les paul junior and a packet of smokes I guess that wasn’t true then? 
Haha, the creepers most likely came from us, but no, there was no easy way to do it back then. There was also considerably more interest for this type of music outside of Sweden. It took a long time before Swedish journalists and media caught on and when they did only The Hellacopters was their focus. Most of the other bands had to deal with the fact that the darlings of the press were them and constantly be compared to them. We were all friends and supported each other in the beginning but to us it felt absurd to be compared to The Hellacopters. Mostly because we, from the start, were isolated and alone on our turf with the influence of all that music that was also claimed by them a few years later. We love The Hellacopters though.
There was this weird self-promoting media culture in Sweden that I guess is hard to understand if you’re not Swedish. Back in the day most all of the more influential music journalists were more interested in writing something sensational and creating a buzz around something than actually covering a scene or some type of music. Some of that self-indulgent culture is still apparent in Swedish music media today. National radio, which is funded by tax money, only play major label crap. Anyone with an underground band knows what I’m talking about.
I mentioned the record you did last year on Ghost Highway with Jeff and you recently mentioned that you just finished up a new “Demons” album any idea when we can see this get released? tell us a bit about the new record?  where was it recorded – producer – any details of the songs or possible title?  
Yeah, there is a new album on the way. The title is Kiss Off and it contains a whole batch of new songs plus a bunch of re-recorded titles from our most recent records. It will be released through God’s Candy Records in April with Get Hip distributing. Most of the basics were recorded in Studio Dubious in Stockholm during different sessions in 2018. Then it was completed and finished in my studio and again mixed in Dubious in Stockholm. I guess we recorded about 70 percent of it ourselves just like the last album, Scarcity Rock.
It’s gonna be our first full length since 2010. The material is maybe a tad more varied and definitely more song-oriented. Someone said it was melodic but it’s more brutal and heavy as well. What can I say? It’s our sound and our style, I can’t really compare it to anything now since it’s so fresh. They are just songs written over a period of two years or something. Personally, as a songwriter, I think it’s the best bunch of songs I’ve written. It is a damn fine album and one of our most focused ever. Hopefully, people will take it to their hearts and join us for the ride.
We kind of decided when we picked up playing again that we never would do another full-length album and only focus on smaller releases on independent labels. That was my ambition anyway. Albums always took too much work and then they never ended up as you wanted. Suddenly we were doing one anyway and I’m glad we did because it’s gonna be a great rock’n’roll record. One of our best.
A lot of this had to do with God’s Candy Records. Brett who runs the label really has an enormous ambition and loves vinyl and its possibilities as an art form as much as we do.
It seems like a great time to be in music as there is so much great music all over the place at the moment people complain about it not getting big but there is plenty out there making fantastic records 
I think what’s happening now is a new growing underground culture that builds on the ’90s, early 00’s high energy and garage punk movements that “DEMONS” had quite a decent part in developing. At least from a Scandinavian perspective. I hope it stays underground.
Sal from Electric Frankenstein is doing a new set of Fistful of Rock’n’roll compilations who showcases the width of what is happening. He took on an incredible task and has done an amazing job. As long as bands are managing themselves, bookers book shows and independent labels put out records it’s great. I think the internet provides a direct communication possibility that has never really been there before. That’s how you can keep it on a grassroots level and still make it work between all parties.
I guess most bands have that dream of making it big. But as I stated earlier you got to figure out why you are playing music. If you want to be a star and make serious money maybe you should go the other way, play some commercial music and find a producer who will shape your sound to something that is playable on the radio. Or just find something else to do that is more commercially viable than playing music. Plus I think that aiming for the majors is a philosophy that is a bit out of date and not very modern. But then again, if you find a major label that fully supports you and your philosophy there isn’t a problem.
what inspires you to keep making music. 
I have music in my head 24 hours a day, always wake up with a song in my head. When I write I usually drink four cups of coffee, put on a record, have the TV on and a couple of books lying around. Then I just start working. That has always been my preferred way to get things done and it’s been that way all my life.
I also buy a lot of records and listen to a lot of music. But I always preferred artists that showcase a little darkness and need to channel real emotions. Everything inspires me in different ways.
Being part of great split records and collaborating with legends like Jeff Dahl is there anything you’d like to fulfill somewhere you’d like to play or someone you’d love to work with?
When I started out I had a long list of people I would have loved to work with. Mostly old idols. These days I will work with anyone who is passionate about what they’re doing as long as it works philosophically. We’ll work with anybody who has a great idea. It’s about creating great stuff. After all these years I just love to work with small labels and people who are driven by dedication and love for music. That is the real reward.
Finally, if there is anything you’d like to tell the readers or promote feel free that’s what we’re here for.  
Stay sick and keep keepin’ on.
Keep an eye out for that new record that is coming out soon I’m sure RPM will be at the front of the queue to cover it and hopefully, some live shows around the place would be nice. A massive Thank you to Matheus for taking the time and sharing his personal pictures and thoughts. Also to Jeff Dahl for hooking us up much appreciated my friend.

Degeneration Hotel, Las Vegas Shakedown

Degeneration Hotel, Las Vegas Shakedown, 2001

Posted by "DEMONS" on Friday, 15 February 2019

Erick Lee Purkhiser (October 21, 1946 – February 4, 2009), better known by the stage name Lux Interior and a firm favourite here at RPM passed away on this day in 2009.  With the true spirit of Rock n Roll coursing through his veins Lux was a unique frontman and someone I’d happily refer to as a genius. He embodied the outsider but was captivating and entertaining just like a frontman should so we raise a glass and toast his memory – gone but certainly not forgotten.

Born in Ohio in 1946 he was named Erick Lee Purkhiser.  He met his wife Kristy Wallace, better known as Poison Ivy, a.k.a. Ivy Rorschach, in Sacramento in 1972, when he and a friend picked her up when she was hitchhiking. The couple founded the band after they moved from California to Ohio in 1973, and then to New York in 1975, where they soon became part of the flourishing punk scene. He got his stage name from a car commercial after originally going by the name Vip Vop (just imagine) 

There should be no need for a summary of what the Cramps were all about and what impact his music had on the public. Lux Interior died at 4:30 a.m. on February 4, 2009, at Glendale Memorial Hospital in California. The cause of death was aortic dissection. He was survived by his wife Ivy and two brothers, Michael Purkhiser and Ronald “Skip” Purkhiser. The memorial service for Lux was held on February 21 at the Windmill Chapel of the Self-Realization Fellowship Lake Shrine. Play some cramps loud tonight in his memory and remember kids – Stay Sick! 

Buy Cramps Music Here

This is the debut mini-album of No wave blues if there’s such a thing. Born out of barroom frequented by midnight dwellers from Stiv Cantarelli and the Silent Strangers its dark smokey and in league with some black magic that’s for sure.  With one hand on the Gun Club back catalogue and the other on the steel strung guitar and overdriven amp that has been used previously by the likes of Gallon Drunk and Birthday Party for sure and you could throw in a healthy (or should that be unhealthy does of The Cramps) for good measure.

‘Barrellhouse Queen’ is like a morning after come down when your head is banging like a big bass drum and everything sounds so distant.  The tension created is mesmeric and whilst at times feels claustrophobic it also feels like its the audio equivalent of the great wide open and all panoramic all within one song. that just doesn’t so much grow but envelops the listener and the louder you can get away with playing it the better.

Reverb-heavy feedback-laden its got warmth and atmosphere for sure and that Alan Vega drum echo is chilling on ‘Headspinner Blues’ and as the slide hits the guitar and the strings vibrate it sends a chill right up my spine. I’m taken back to when I first heard Jesus and Mary Chain and their debut single hit my stereo its the same gut-wrenching primal scream (no pun intended) its got a heartbeat that says 50’s rock n roll but its also raging against contemporary music and all its studio trickery as this sounds like its one take one mic one idea – done ‘Mr. Williamson’ fades like smoke rising from a burning pyre.

‘Broken Bones Blues’ is like suicide meets the delta blues and my head is banging along to that distorted beat. to cap it all off if you need any encouragement the final offering is a mesmeric beat beating away entitled ‘Down At The Public House’.  Get this on the road along with Paul-Ronney and his Urban Voodoo Machine who would be the ideal drinking partner for this slice of dark underworld Rock and Roll.  Waste no time in sourcing this out if you’ve ever had a hankering for any of the bands referenced in this review because your going to love this no doubt about it.

Buy Here

Author: Dom Daley

 

Not Just your regular summer, no sir, this one is hot! and its only getting hotter!

June 2018

 

Whilst May was relatively quiet (slang) June was positively bristling with releases and live shows for the RPM crew and the beginning of the festival season was open.  But we couldn’t mention June 2018 without a few tributes to fallen comrades in Rock and Roll.

Firstly, Heavy Drapes frontman Garry Alexander Borland passed away the first week after returning from Holland after a really successful show at Rebellion over there.  Garry’s passing was a huge shock to people close to him obviously but his passing was also felt in the wider alternative community with his band on the verge of much bigger and better things what with the up and coming decent billing at Rebellion UK and their debut album ready to go so its only right we record this moment and pay tribute to Garry.  May he rest in peace.

Another sad passing was that of  DJ Fontana who was Elvis Presley’s drummer for many a year, Dominic Joseph Fontana was responsible for laying down the backbeat on almost 500 songs with the king which is no mean feat and a really impressive CV by any standard also it’s only right we recognise his contribution to music.  Rest in Peace DJ.

Sadly a third influential musician passed away in June this year, none other than Nick Knox the second but longest-serving Cramps drummer. Nick joined the band from the Electric Eels and occupied the drum stool from 1977-1991, Knox toured with the band and appeared on some of the Cramps’ best recordings, ‘Songs The Lord Taught Us, ‘Psychedelic Jungle’ and ‘A Date With Elvis’. Rest In Peace Nick Knox the man behind Lux and the man behind the shades.

Sadly the fourth person to pass away in June was none other than West coast punk rock legend Steve Soto of The Adolescents. Steve was originally the bass player in Agent Orange back in ’79 he then served as bass player in the Adolescents until passing.  the most recent album ‘Cropduster‘ being his final piece of work and easily one of 2018 finest albums.  The band went on to tour the summer around Europe with stand-in player and dedicated the set each night to Steve where they had a backdrop replacing the band’s logo and replacing it with SOTO at Rebellion in August Tony Reflex dedicated the show to his bandmate in a touching speech and subsequent performance that was electric and memorable,  Rest In Peace Steve 54 is way too young. 

 

Right hopefully onto much happier matters for the month of June 2018. With Festival season in full swing Fraser headed to Download and watched The Bronx, The Hives and Turbonegro show the festivals other acts how Rock and Roll was meant to be delivered to the people. elsewhere it seemed like the world and his Mrs were off to see the Rolling Stones play some enormadome or should that be a field?

IT might have cost the GDP of some countries to get close enough to see the band measure up to the size of a subbutteo player but it has to be said nobody was disappointed in either the performance or the setlist the band was knocking out on this leg of the tour. Jagger was ever his peter pan like self careering from one side of the huge stage to the other like he was a child with more energy than most performers more than half his age and some.

Nev decided he’d bowl darn London way and take in what Camden Rocks had to offer.  Basically, all the pubs of any note and the dive bars, as well as the more famous landmarks such as Dingwalls, Electric Ballroom etc throw, open their doors to live Rock and Roll for the day and if you have a wristband and there’s room at the inn then uh, you’re in! Just wear some comfortable shoes and a stage planner.  You might just happen across your favourite new band or someone you’ve been meaning to catch and hey presto there they are. (Deep Breath time) This year Nev caught The Ramonas at the Dublin CastleDirty Thrills at The Underworld Talia Dean in Brew Dog then back to the underworld for Sonic Boom Six and some knees up skanking ska which went down rather well with Nev. It wouldn’t have been right had our roving scribe not caught Urban Voodoo Machine down at the lock where the place to be was indeed Dingwalls then to finish off a marathon of live entertainment it was Camden Assembly for some Ryan Hamilton & The Traitors before the Rifles was a curtain call for Mr Brooks but he wasn’t banking on bumping into Paul-Ronny Angel either so his night wasn’t quite over!

Not wanting to be a party pooper Nev still had to take in Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds playing the All Points East Festival along with an impressive support cast of Patti Smith, St Vincent and Courtney Barnett.

Ben went to Rambling Man Fair and enjoyed the performances of such heavyweight rockers as The Cult and also managed to catch RPM favourites  Jim Jones and The Righteous Mind as well as the real mock rockers Steel Panth..Nah I can’t type it sorry folks I’d be doing RPM a disservice even mentioning them. anyway, Ben also managed to take in the large club gig of the month that was the triple-headed Britrock Must Be Destroyed touring carnival that featured a rotating line up of Reef, The Wildhearts, and Terrorvision. there were multiple dates to be fair and it was decided on the day how the running order would play out. I reckon each band made new fans on the night as reports were coming in of all three raising each others game and an excellent way to tour. The night Ben had in Leeds also saw Dodgy added to the lineup.

 

Our intrepid European correspondent or one of them Craggy got to see Repetitor live at Kabinet Muz, Brno I said Craggy got to see Repetitor in Brno…oh forget it he enjoyed it anyway said it was one of his highlights of the year to be fair.

Now with a sharp intake of breath June was positively overflowing with album releases that would bother top tens come the end of the year. Just a few of those contenders has to be The Interrupters with their ‘Fight The Good Fight’ that saw them leap up the rankings with a fantastic collection of tunes that was shaking up not just fans of the bands previous two albums but new music fans who heard one of the many potential hits on the radio or tv with the album set to just keep on selling and selling we are looking at the next big thing as they won’t be playing clubs for much longer.

Getting Tim Armstrong in to produce the record is a great move as the guy oozes class and knows his way around a ska-punk record and if he had a hand in any of the songwriting or arranging then boy pat yourselves on the back because the infectious ‘A Friend Like Me’, ‘Shes Kerosene’ and the awesome ‘Got Each Other’ are three reasons why this record will deservedly be in many ends of year top 3’s and rightly so..

Elsewhere June saw the release of London Towns Portuguese legends The Parkinson’s return with the LP ‘The Shape Of Nothing To Come’ that confirmed that these gentlemen still had it and it was a fine return to the fold in every way. Now expanded to a five piece you can take the boys out of punk rock but you can’t ever take the punk rock out of the boys and that boys and girls is a fact. the Parkinsons still have the chops.

Another couple of worthy mentions in the albums released in June has to be Smash Fashion and their ‘Rompus Pompous’.  Which has gone down a right storm at RPM as they’ve really hit their stride on this one and joioning them would have to be Nottingham’s The Speedways with the fantastic slice of power pop that is ‘Just Another Regular Summer’ the brains behind the idea to write an album was Matt former guitarist of The Breakdowns he’s since formed a band after the success of the record and has played  a number of shows and next year they’ve already planned some shows in Spain and London.  It really is power pop perfection and a record we highly recommend.

The old school shouldn’t be forgotten either because June was also the month when the phrase you can’t teach an old dog new tricks was debunked because The Uk Subs once again released a new album ‘Subversions’ of some of their favourite songs by other people – sure a cover album.  there might well be some you could see coming but there are others on the album that you would never have seen coming. 

Over in NYC the birthplace of hardcore and home to some of the best bands around Madball made a new record they put out in June 2018 and the brutal ‘For The Cause’ was unleashed on the world and immediately felt at home with the RPM crew.

Finally a mention of records released in June this time for the magnificent London power poppin’ punk rockin’ Los Pepe who released their long playing Greatest Hits on Snap Records! it came with a CD of the album and they also got to knock out a single this month as well which was nice. Don’t get me started on singles that appeared this month because ther were plenty with my pick of the pack coming from the Randy Savages who were ‘Guilty Of Nuthin’ .

 

In a week when RPM brought you interviews Live Reviews and album Reviews from far and wide, we scoured the globe to bring you bands and releases that matter so you don’t have to do the hard work. Sit back skive off and enjoy.

 

As far as interviews go we went to Vienna for Reverend Backflash Swansea for Jack Jones out of Trampolene who head out on tour this month all over the UK.  we also brought you the words of Jeff Dahl and what his plans are for 2019. Right there are three reasons to keep it RPM for all the chatter that matters in the same week as well! Damn, how good was that?

If those interviews weren’t enough we also brought you album reviews from legends like Glen Matlock who released a new record with some help from the likes of Slim Jim Phantom and Earl Slick. If that wasn’t enough to make you good to go then we also brought you music from Australia in the shape of the excellent Black Heart Breakers, Noo Yawk City in the shape of The Erotics and obviously it wouldn’t be right if Canada didn’t wade in with a new record from a band with immense potential and a bunch of tunes you’d expect from a band who have been around the block a few times in the shape of Sick Things whose album is just getting the vinyl treatment from Gods Candy Records.

 

We might have been a bit stingy on the live front this past week but we did venture to Vienna for some TV Smith and finish the week wiping the sweat and maybe a tear or two from one’s cheek as Jonny Cola And The A-Grades said hello goodbye and thanks for the ride which was a great place to check out for the week.

Now. This week we’ve already brought you Rich Jones and Paul Collins interviews and we have some killer live reviews from the likes of King Brothers and Eric Martin as well as plenty of albums we crack open from Dave Kusworth, Palmyra Delran and Estrons as well as a classic reissue that’s coming on RSD Black Friday that people shouldn’t miss.

 

Not too shabby on the old rock and roll front there I’m sure you’ll agree? Remember to keep it RPM and don’t let anyone tell you there isn’t any rock and roll anymore because we know and you know that’s just bull shit right? Right! If you think you have what it takes to join our band of scribes then drop us a line at rpmonlinetcb@yahoo.com and introduce yourself – we don’t bite and are quite a welcoming bunch.  thanks and as Lux said – stay sick!