After the innermost journey, it seems about right we should engage with ‘Satans helpers, War Lazer Eyes And The Money Pig Circus’. Confused? Relax, sit back, and take a deep breath its only an album title.

I’ll set the picture for you, Sami Yaffa managed to turn in the album of the year when he released his debut solo album in 2021. It had everything and confirmed with many of us how fuckin talented the guy is. Not content with being the coolest bass player on the planet or playing on some of the best records ever he had to go and write produce sing and play on a solo album that was so fuckin good it was almost unfathomable. Roll on a couple of years and Mr Yaffa is back in the ring and taking precision shots again like the heavyweight player he is.

The first glimpse into album number two was the Iggyfied ‘Crashing Down’ and with a confident swagger, Sami was on top of his game with another earworm that sounded so good it made me grin for days. Excited at what was coming down the line and the first taste was exactly what I wanted to hear. Such is Samis laid back demeanour is infectious and engaging and it puts the listener in the best frame of mind for listening to some of the finest music currently being laid down anywhere by anyone.

The title track rolls in on a cool countrified lick that gathers pace before exploding into widescreen as Yaffas well worn, warm vocal wraps itself around you like a warm comforting blanket and the opening of this much-anticipated album is done.

‘Silver Or Lead’ rattles in off the back of the widescreen opener with a sharp, stripped back song with plenty of punch and gang vocals on the chorus but it’s the arrangement that gives the song an air of excitement that draws you the listener in. ‘Hurricane Hank’ is one cool motherfucker by the swagger of his soundtrack. A cool bluesy lick is held by some cool keyboard rattling over a rapid fuzzed guitar.

One thing Yaffa is clearly gifted is the ability to change pace and style yet keep it perfectly on point whatever the style so ‘Death Squad’ is the first glimpse of the reggae skank we had on that first record and it’s here with the keyboard slap with rhythmic stabs to groove alongside the skank of that clean guitar with its bluesy licks.

‘Down Home’ is laid on a bed of acoustic guitar chords and a warm pained vocal. It’s not quite a ballad but has a gentler hand maybe more Americana in the vein of say Jesse Malin at the top of his game. In contrast ‘Shitshow’ is rockin’ out at its finest from the storming the gates guitar break that’s scorching the speakers as it bursts through. No time for finery or complicated arrangments it’s heads down and lets rock! Some wonderful piano fills and backing vocals to accompany this rocka.

Whilst we’re deep into the record we have the first single that dropped several weeks ago ‘Crashing Down’ and it still sounds like the best song Iggy never wrote anytime over the last thirty years. ‘Chemical Life’ has the funk pulsing through the bassline sounding like an adventure through the NYC underbelly from the keys and that funkified bass to the cool lyric and fucked up flavours created by the brass and percussion exploding all over the place. A fantastic song and even after so few plays it sounds like a track to delve into for years to come.

A more varied album than his debut and touching upon all his previous bands and roles within bands Sami Yaffa has really spread his wings on ‘Satans Helpers’ there is perhaps a supreme confidence happening here before our eyes and ears and the off-kilter groove of ‘Far Star’ is his most varied offering yet. It could have been offered up to Harry and Chris Stein around the time they were eating to the beat it has that LES charm as the mist rolls in off the Hudson it might turn out to be the record’s buried gem the more play I give this, Only time will tell.

The record is almost done and already I’m excited to do it all again and see what pops out of my speakers on the next play. ‘Faster Than Me’ has a carefree vibe that is like a ray of sunshine after the storm. You know that satisfying smug feeling when you’ve looked forward to a new record and it absolutely doesn’t disappoint, well, ‘Satans Helper’ is exactly that record. I think it’s safe to say that Sami Yaffa will once again be challenging for the album of the year title such is the quality of this album after only a few plays.

Now, go and ask your local record store to get you a copy of ‘Satans Helpers, Warlazer Eyes & The Money Pig Circus’ it might just be the best record you buy in 2024 and you can quote me on that!

Buy Here

Author: Dom Daley

Completists and people who have never heard of Hanoi Rocks keep reading. Everyone else not curious please look away and yes I know there are complete vinyl box sets out there as well as several one-stop box sets but there’s always room for another Hanoi Rocks catch-all set.

What we have here is a very neat and tidy summary of the world’s bestust band and all their hard work in one clamshell box spread over five CD’s. For those well rounded individuals who always knew Hanoi Rocks were the greatst band to emerge from the beautiful 1980s their musical output might well have been flawed and it moght well have been scatterguned over the early to mid eighties but they never dipped below better than anything else you were listening to and they alway did things differently to other bands and they were such an underated bunch of reprobates to ever lay down music.

It always makes me laugh when people say it’s music for fans of Guns N Roses or they were a glam band because your average supermarket music-buying Guns fan or your die-hard glam fan wouldn’t have a clue. Call me a music snob but Hanoi was far more than a glam band and it was they who influenced Guns n Roses and a whole bunch of tripe that was to follow in the decade of decadence. Hanoi was a rock n roll band who were more influenced by punk and what went before them in the 70s – a perfect mix of The Clash and T Rex as well as adding equal measures of early Japan with Chuck Berry they had Jaggers swagger and the elegance of Bowie and weren’t afraid to mix it up from disc on and the magnificent bass drum count in of ‘Tragedy’ with the familiar Yaffa rumble it has never ever lost its flavour. A youthful Monroe leads this bunch of renegades through a magnificent album with all its imperfections and charming backing vocals it’s still the beating heart of a magnificent journey and an album I’ve never tired of.

The skank of ‘Village Girl’ to the teary ‘Don’t You Ever Leave Me’. The Harmonica honk of ‘Lost In The City’ is still a magnificent blast of youthful energy – the levels are everywhere the mix is chaotic but that was the appeal, too fast too young too fuckin beautiful. McCoy’s vocals howling over the top is brilliant and the energy that drives on this record. Who else was doing songs like ‘Cheyanne’? it’s beautiful from the bv’s to the drum pound and runs down of the Yaffa bassline to the strain on Monroe’s vocals its still one of the greatest debut albums ever. I’ll fight anyone who disagrees.

The recent Svart real mix of ‘Oriental Beat’ this one brings on mixed feelings for me now and I wish and hope the others get the same treatment if it’s available. ‘Motorvatin’ is still a banger which is why it’s still prominent in today’s Monroe set. ‘No Law Or Order’ is still one of the best songs Strummer never wrote. Ending with ‘Falling Star’ was and is a tear-jerker of the finest order.

I’m trying to imagine what it must be like to take the plunge and hear these albums as one package for the first time and not have to wait in real time over half a decade for them to unfold. My memory is foggy due to the fact it’s 40 years ago (holy shit, but I’m still here) ‘Self Destruction Blues’ was or shouldn’t have ever been but thank god it did. A million miles away from the debut production-wise and songwriting wise but hell, it still gives me chills playing these songs loudly and whilst I might not have played some of these songs for years when I do I still get that feeling of “hell, what a band, what a record” how weren’t these one of the biggest bands on the planet?

Disc four is obviously ‘Back To Mystery City’ and where they truly hit their stride – every one a banger from ‘Malibu Beach’ through ‘Tooting Bec Wreck’ to the beautiful ‘Until I Get You’ one of the finest soft songs for tough guys ever written. Razzles’ touch and understanding of what was needed on the loud ballad is exceptional. ‘Lick Summer Love’ is awesome and sets the tone for the spectacular ‘Beating Gets Faster’ deep dive classics I think the kids would call these album tracks that don’t get the oxygen they deserve.

This box set might be a time capsule and something awesome to discover but to hear ‘Mystery City again for the first time whilst pawing over the artwork would be priceless and some kid is going to discover that when they pick this up in a record store or online. Imagine hearing ‘All Those Wasted Years’ for the first time and wishing you were forty years older haha! what a beautiful thought ‘Taxi Driver’ Boom heads gone!

Maybe if this had had a sixth disc full of unheard demos or lost tracks it would sell like hotcakes to the Hanoi (de)generation looking for a fix. If you know a kid whos just discovering music and looking for a collection that will blow their mind then this might just be the clamshell all encompassing boxset you need. If for no other reason other than being a completist sucker I applaud Cherry Red for keeping the Hanoi heart beating – God bless em and God bless all those who sailed in the good ship Hanoi Rocks you truly were game changes for some of us punks looking for our band. Buy It!

Buy Here

Author: Dom Daley

The year is 2023 and I’m sat at home waiting for my Hanoi Rocks album to be delivered but with many things you simply have to wait and good things are worth waiting for and any original or should that be classic Hanoi Rocks album is well worth the wait.

I used to be a bit sceptical about bands doing a remaster or remix especially if its a classic album but as I’ve got older I’ve dug deep into some of my favourite records when they’ve had the overhaul treatment, especially some of those half speed jobs from Abbey Road and when I heard the difference Japans ‘Quiet Life’ had or some of the classic ‘Rolling Stones’ records sounding like a different album at times it can be a bit of a head fuck when they’re done well. What lowered my scepticism was hearing the Senseless Things overhaul of ‘The First Of Too Many’ and how much better the new version was compared to the muddy original I was converted and won over in one fell swoop and now I’d happily champion and shell out for a well-done remix/master which has brought us to this hallowed spot and the mighty, unparalleled, unrivalled Hanoi Rocks and this here Svart release of ‘Oriental Beat’.

Delays delays delays, I’ve put off reviewing this album and its re(al)mix but couldn’t wait any longer for my record to turn up so I’ve delved into the digital and sat back with my hands over my face as the virtual needle dropped and ‘Oriental Beat’ hit the ether and blew my fragile tiny mind. Wow, congratulations to Svart for doing something I didn’t think possible. ‘Oriental Beat’ sounds like an album that was released yesterday it’s got volume, punch, new clarity and moments I’d either forgotten about or were never listenable to the human ear. Sweet Baby Jesus! Hallalulija hark the herald angels sing. This is how Hanoi Rocks sound just listen to Sami Yaffa’s bass thumping its way through the title opening track it’s unbelievable. Truly a cut above and those BV’s are exceptional. I’ll admit it’s been a couple of years since I spun this album and when I heard it was being treated to an overhaul I wasn’t sure if Genius should be tampered with but on the evidence, Man I’m converted.

The strangest thing abou tthis version would be the track listing but dropping ‘Motorvatin’ deeper into the album is worth it because once you get your head around the sound the intro is a real highlight. The second Hanoi album saw them becomeing a real unique force sure they still leant on their heroes like the best song the Clash never wrote in ‘No Law No Order’ or the Mick n Keif locked in playing on the epic ‘Teenagels Outsiders’ where I think Monroe sounded amazing. Youthful exuberance and developing a unique style I think he’d really come into his own here and the saxophone use was and still is exceptional and I never understood why it wasn’t used more in punk rock when Hanoi used it it was brilliant as it was for bands like The Lords Of The New Church and Johnny Thunders but Hanoi were different, they used it best of all.

The groove and open-heart honesty of McCoys playing on ‘Sweet Home Suburbia’ is incredible the sustain is almost visual. I can’t express how much better this version is and once I get used to the track listing all will be well in the world and I will start to get on to whoever I have to to see if the master tapes for other albums are available for this sort of treatment. I don’t think I’m saying anything outrageous here but this album has only gone to cement how vital each member of the band was and how integral and truly amazing Yaffa was to the sound of the band. There are moments I haven’t fully appreciated before and some of the walking bass lines are majestic ‘Lightnin’ Bar Blues’ as is the harmonica of Monroe on ‘Devil Woman’. The band should be rightfully proud of this project its an emotional and exceptional piece of work that is an absolute must heart for any fan old or new it is worth every single penny and some. Special praise must also go to Petri Majuri for his input into this project and his exceptional work of drawing out the demons and replacing them with angels’ wings ‘Oriental Beat’ is already one of the best albums ever and is now even better – Buy this record!

Buy Here

Author: Dom Daley

Well, this is timely. Having just finished reading Sami Yaffa’s excellent autobiography, and whilst waiting for his upcoming second solo album, Svart Records have reissued Mad Juana’s debut album. Originally released in 1997, this project by Sami and Karmen Guy is perhaps better suited to today’s more tolerant musical climate. It certainly had people puzzled on release, as Sami mixed influences from around the world, having spent most of his life on the road.

From ‘6 Inch Ditch’ onwards, with its sparse, Bo Diddley rhythm and percussion, it is a hypnotic ride. If you like The Urban Voodoo Machine, you’ll want hear this. ‘Festival Of Dreams’ introduces fretless bass to the sound, another left-turn; Sami was keen to make music without the boundaries of his past, and this remains one of his proudest moments. With hindsight, you can understand why. Recorded on a shoestring budget between Mallorca and Finland, ably assisted by percussionist Affe Forsman, they successfully merged Hispanic, European and Arabic chords and scales; ‘Stronghand Mo’ creating a mantra-like riff.

The percussion on ‘Flesh’ is reminiscent of ‘Tin Drum’ era Japan, and Karmen has a vocal not unlike P J Harvey on ‘1000 x More’ and ‘No End’, the latter turning up the volume. It demands your attention. ‘Red Sea’ has a more traditional acoustic rhythm that could be The Waterboys, while closer ‘Spell’ is atmospheric enough to be a film soundtrack starring Harry Dean Stanton. If you understand what I’m blathering on about, search this out now. Remastered, and with 5 previously unreleased demos, this showed the world that Sami Yaffa was much more than “just a bassist”. We’re only just catching up with him now.

Buy Here

Author: Martin Chamarette

1994 was a very good year for music. Everything was a bit edgy back then. Alternative was king, Grunge had killed hair metal and in turn was dying a death. Nu Metal and Industrial sounds were on the rise with Korn and NIN, Green Day and Rancid were spearheading a punk movement for the MTV generation and over in the UK Oasis were making waves, while The Wildhearts and Terrorvison were regularly seen bouncing around on Top Of The Pops.

Bands had to adapt to survive and those that did survive released arguably the best albums of their careers. From Manic Street Preachers and King’s X to Motley Crue and Warrior Soul, all with varying degrees of success but all had one thing in common and that is: those albums stand the test of time nearly 30 years on. And of course, Michael Monroe was in that mix as well with a band called Demolition 23.

Following the ill-fated Jerusalem Slim project with Steve Stevens, Michael Monroe went back to his roots, collaborated with Little Steven and wrote a punk rock album in the spirit of ‘77. Pulling in Hanoi Rocks bassist Sami Yaffa, Star Star guitar slinger Jay Hening and session drummer Jimmy Clarke, what started as a covers band jamming with friends, turned into a serious project.

Recorded in 5 days at Power Station Studios in New York City, produced and largely written by Little Steven along with Monroe and his first wife Jude Wilder, the eponymous 10 track album was a throwback to the Hanoi days and a tribute in spirit to lost friends and heroes such as Stiv Bators, Johnny Thunders and Charlie Harper.

To be honest, the production job back then was pretty spot on and you would have to play the original back-to-back with the remaster to spot the differences. But I’m pleased to say it sounds as crisp, fresh and damn right essential as it did back in 1994.

I always loved Monroe’s thought-provoking lyrics and album opener ‘Nothin’s Alright’ has always been a favourite. From the roaring, 3 chord riffage to the cool lyricism, each verse a love letter to the past 3 decades (at the time), it channeled the much-needed gap between the Sex Pistols raw energy and Hanoi’s penchant for a catchy tune.

The following ‘Hammersmith Palais’ again, is a retrospective look to times and places that are long gone. A theme that has continued through Monroe’s lyrics to this day. A punked up blast with an anthemic “oi-oi” chorus that is an instant earworm. It’s about as British punk as you can get, which is quite a thing considering its Finnish/USA writing heritage! 

A killer one-two as good as any album before it, and a pair of songs that remain constants in Michael Monroe’s live set to this day. Demolition 23 sound energized, fresh and vital in 2022.

As Demolition 23 was initially a covers band, it makes sense that a few of those tunes they jammed would feature. The Dead Boys ‘Ain’t Nothin’ To Do’ and UK Subs ‘Endangered Species’ are suitably raucous and filled with attitude. But its Johnny Thunders ramshackle ‘I Wanna Be Loved’ that blows the cobwebs off, even by today’s standards. Hening’s guitar tone is perfection and the vocal delivery has enough spit and venom to better the original. It’s a glorious blast that the band make their own.

‘Scum Lives On’ was originally on the Jerusalem Slim album. The Demolition 23 version is rawer and more in tune with the punk attitude. Even the dumb ass, tongue in cheek ‘Same Shit, Different Day’ sounds vital.

The emotive ‘You Crucified Me’ showcases the Van Zandt/Monroe ability to pen radio-friendly hit singles, and you probably forgot how good it was until you listen to this remaster. It sounds like it was recorded last week, not a lifetime ago.

The included demos of ‘Hammersmith Palais’, ‘Dysfunctional’ and ‘Scum Lives On’ are curiosos and don’t vary too much from the originals, but surely must be a testament to the fact that these 10 songs were the full recorded legacy of one of the greatest forgotten bands of the 90’s.

Of course, good things never last. Hening was replaced by Nasty Suicide on guitar by the time they started touring, but he left in March 1995 and the band folded soon after. Hening tragically passed away not long after and while Sami continues to play in Michael Monroe’s solo band, as far as I am aware Demolition 23 have only reformed once for Monroe’s 60th birthday bash in Helsinki recently.

With only a limited release in 1994 on CD, this is an album that has been crying out for the vinyl remaster treatment for years. It remains a lost classic and hopefully, this remaster will give it the distribution and worldwide regard that this long-lost classic album truly deserves. An essential purchase folks.

Buy Here

Author: Ben Hughes

“The Demolition 23. album is one of my favorite albums of my career and definitely one of the best.”- Michael Monroe

“Me and Michael were talking about how much we missed the original Punk music of the Ramones and Dead Boys and Sex Pistols and Clash and decided to do an album in that spirit.”- Stevie Van Zandt

Stevie Van Zandt’s Wicked Cool Records has announced plans to reissue the sole album from Demolition 23.digitally for the first time ever, and on CD + ‘Blue Smoke’ vinyl, on October 14. The band, which formed in NYC in 1993, consisted of former Hanoi Rocks frontman Michael Monroe, ex-Star Star guitarist Jay Hening, Monroe’s Hanoi Rocks bandmate Sami Yaffa on bass, and Jimmy Clark on drums.’Demolition 23.’ (which had a limited release in 1994, but has since been out of print for years) was produced by Van Zandt, and features collaborative songwriting efforts between Monroe, Van Zandt, and Jude Wilder, and one track (“Deadtime Stories”) co-written by Monroe/Stiv Bators. The album, a return to the members’ punk roots, also includes covers by Monroe’s influences and friends, including Stiv Bators (“Ain’t Nothin’ To Do”) and Johnny Thunders (“I Wanna Be Loved”). Many of the songs from the record have become staples in Monroe’s live sets, which recently have included festivals and a stint opening for Alice Cooper.The digital and CD release of ‘Demolition 23.’ includes all of the original songs, along with 3 bonus demos. See track listing below. The physical versions of the album include a booklet with photos and liner notes from Monroe, detailing each song — with additional notes written by all of the living band members. The vinyl also includes a download card for the bonus tracks. The band’s logo was designed by Yaffa, who continues to play with Monroe to this day.In advance of the self-titled album’s re-release, a track titled “Hammersmith Palais” has been released to streaming sites, along with a demo version of the song.
Pre-save the album here

Michael Monroe on the single “Hammersmith Palais”:

“Hammersmith Palais was this great club in London where we saw a lot of brilliant, legendary shows by some of the coolest bands ever. I played there once guesting on sax and harp with the Lords of the New Church. Unfortunately in later years, the place was closed down and replaced by a boring office building. The song also refers to some great, fun times in the past that will never return.”

Michael Monroe on the re-issue of ‘Demolition 23.’:

“The Demolition 23. album is one of my favorite albums of my career and definitely one of the best. I had the pleasure and privilege of having my great friend Little Steven as the producer. This was originally going to be a Michael Monroe solo album, but we had put together such a strong group with Sami Yaffa on bass, Jimmy Clark on drums and Jay Hening (RIP) on guitar, that I decided the band should have a name. Sami Yaffa suggested “Demolition 23” from the William Burroughs book “Exterminator” and it immediately hit a nerve.

Little Steven and I had been writing the songs with very much an authentic kind of Punky Rock& Roll attitude and style. We also wanted to pay homage to the late legendary unsung heroes and my friends Stiv Bators and Johnny Thunders by covering one song each– The Dead Boys’“Ain’t Nothin’ To Do” and Johnny Thunders & The Heartbreakers’ “I Wanna Be Loved.”

The album was recorded at the end of 1993 at the Power Station Studios in New York City by the great engineer Ben Fowler. This was one of the easiest and most fun times I’ve ever had recording an album. The comfort of having the production in the good hands of Little Steven allowed me to relax and enjoy doing my thing. Steven brought out the best in everybody and we didn’t waste any time. We laid down the basic tracks, drums, bass and guitars for the 10songs in 3 days and I did my lead vocals in 2 days. It was like 2 vocal takes per song, then Steven would say “Ok that’s good! Next!” After the 5 days of recording, we mixed one song per day, so the whole album took about 2 weeks to make. And it still sounds great today. This record was never officially released in the States, but now Little Steven is FINALLY releasing it on his Wicked Cool label for everyone’s enjoyment.

As bonus tracks, we’re including 3 demos that we recorded at New York’s Baby Moster Studio prior to recording the album. I remember when we finished our session there, the Ramones came in and started setting up for the next session to record their cover of “I Love You” for the Johnny Thunders tribute album “I Only Wrote This Song For You.” I’ll never forget when Johnny Ramone started hitting some chords on his Moarite guitar–it was so loud you could hear it in every room of the studio. Anyway, these 3 demos already indicate what a great chemistry Demolition 23 had as a band. Hope you dig this album as much as we all do!

Stevie Van Zandt on the Demolition 23. reissue:

“The Demolition 23. album is one of my favorite records. Me and Michael were talking about how much we missed the original Punk music of the Ramones and Dead Boys and Sex Pistols and Clash and decided to do an album in that spirit. It was written in two weeks and Produced in two weeks. Love it.”

Sami Yaffa should be a household name.  Some of the bands he’s played with should be household names, and some of the records he’s made should be in every self-respecting music lover’s collection.  Sami Yaffa is a Bass guitar-playing Legend. 

I know the term legend gets banded about willy nilly and people refer to players who should be nowhere near the word but there are some artists who are the absolute embodiment of Rock and Roll and worthy of the word legend. From his humble beginnings and his love of music from many genres through his time as the bass player in Hanoi Rocks through his dalliances with Joan Jett, Demolition 23, New York Dolls, Jetboy, Hellacopters and most recently old sparring partner Michael Monroe who to be fair have been a going concern for the best part of a decade and most recently his solo album that wiped the floor with everything released last year Sami Yaffa is a Rock and Roll Icon as far as I’m concerned and now the fucker is a published author with magic in his pen and a wonderfully engaging style that shines like his personality from his humble beginnings right up until 2016. 

Mysterious yet open.  Up for a party yet shy, charming and seemingly always living life with a smile and a jour de Vivre that has seen him through some horrendous challenges yet the guy rolls with the punches and pulls through stronger and more determined.  Yaffa must be a fucker to be around with such qualities most mortals can only dream about achieving and boy has he got a story to tell.

The book opens with his humble beginnings as he sets the scene of how his formative years set him in good stead for what was to come. Yaffa’s style is engaging and you feel like you’re in the passenger seat for the ride there’s a flow to his story that’s engaging and throughly captivating, especially for a fan of his work.  The stories aren’t bogged down with detail but the sense of adventure and ability to roll with the punches shines through and his unwavering love of music no matter what genre is always about how it affects your heart and soul.

I’m always a bit miffed when I speak to musicians who claim to not listen to music or keep an interest in what’s happening around them nor seemingly give a shit about their own music once it’s been put in the can.  Yaffa is like a sponge and his modesty shines like a star when working with others every day is a school day and striving to be better is never a bad thing.  I’ve lived my whole youth and adult life with Sami’s music and whatever he gets involved with usually turns out to be something I need to be listening to be it his punk roots, the reincarnation of the Dolls, his roots music through Mad Juana, Jetboy, Joan Jett to Hanoi Rocks (the best band ever) to his debut solo album in 2021 He’s also a documentary maker his skills make you sick if he didn’t have such a warm smile.

As a teenager, Hanoi rocks dished up everything I loved about music and Sami was a vital part of the story and his input was a huge part of the sound. He talks fondly about the band, especially some of the trips they had but he never shys away from being honest and how they fell apart or at least how his time was done and how being in the band was affecting his health physically and mentally.  Sure they were flawed and it was their imperfections that were a big part of why people loved them so much even if their story is tragic and a well-trodden path reading Sami’s take is captivating and heartbreaking.  Apart from the pretty shambolic Sherrif McCoy book, it’s the first English worded inside track from any member of the band. But seeing it all laid out in front of you as big a part as Hanoi was there is so much more to Sami’s legacy than one band. I particularly loved reading about his chaotic time working with Steve Stevens which then led to the Demolition 23. period and the band that grew for that record.

I love reading biographies and autobiographies and the master of this genre is Alvin Gibbs another bass player whose career overlaps with Yaffa’s on several levels as far as players go, I’d probably have them both at the pinnacle of style in playing and approach to music as well as both playing on some of my favourite records and had Sami not been so loyal he might have had the Iggy gig and Alvin’s legacy would have been a little lighter than it is, sliding doors and all that.

I don’t was to give any spoilers except to say I laughed out loud at some of the stories and drifted off into what could have been with others but throughout the book it is a real page-turner, heartfelt, warm, insightful, honest and engaging – exactly what you’d want from the writer and another excellent addition is that excerpts of the book come on a 12-inch record to accompany where Sami reads excerpts from the book.  I love it all and if there’s one book you need to check out this year then it’s this, absolutely fantastic – makes you piggin sick. Hopefully, it won’t be so long before we get the second volume where Sami brings us up to date and spills the beans on what he did from 2016 to right here right now! Brilliant

Buy Here

Author: Dom Daley

You can pre-order the new album ‘I Live Too Fast To Die Young’ and assorted goodies from Here. The album comes out on June 10th and is the first new music from the band since 2019 ‘One Man Gang’.

“It’s an ode to our wives and loved ones who have stuck by our sides through years of playing music and touring the world,” offers Monroe on the new single. “But this can also apply to any person working hard, away from home a lot of the time, who is lucky enough to have a loved one sticking by their side through thick and thin. So, it’s a celebratory song to our nearest and dearest who are always there for us.”

“It’s a big, 1970’s Slade-inspired glam stomper,” adds Rich Jones, “It celebrates our loved ones who support us through the ups and downs of being a touring musician”.

Throughout his latest (and greatest) venture I Live Too Fast To Die Young, Monroe tells tales of glory and observed stories, some pretty, some shitty, but all through a lens of eventual optimism, hope and a sense of dirty, cheeky late-night fun. Monroe’s lens has always been directed towards the upside, even after the greatest downs a man can suffer, and the sheer power of his positive energy infuses everything he comes into contact with.

The eleven lean, mean, raw power rock ‘n’ roll songs which make up I Live Too Fast To Die Young see Monroe swagger the streets like a rock-punk poet, a storyteller who’s seen it all from the hellholes of Helsinki to the late-nights in London’s St. Moritz with some trashy times in Tokyo to boot. Warm, funny, occasionally sad but ultimately upbeat, I Live Too Fast To Die Young brings the listener into the heart and soul of its creator.

The title track, ‘I Live Too Fast To Die Young’, is quintessential Monroe, playing with words and concepts in a playfully irreverent way and wrapping it all up in some proper ‘fuck you’ rock ‘n’ roll. A close friend of Monroe’s, Slash from Guns N’ Roses, throws down some lead guitar on the track.

Recorded at Inkfish Studios in Helsinki, Finland between November and December 2021 and produced by the band with engineer Erno Laitinen, the album features Monroe on lead vocals and harmonica, Steve Conte (guitars and vocals), Rich Jones (guitar, vocals), Karl Rockfist (drums) and Sami Yaffa (bass/vocals/guitar). With I Live Too Fast To Die Young, it is clear Michael Monroe is striding into the summer with a triumphant -and perhaps most importantly, defiant- roar to offer you a chance to let your hair down (or up!) and to once again enjoy the freedom of joyous celebration and expression.

The band is due to appear at a string of summer festival shows and will be touring in support of the album on the following dates:

04 Jun – ROCK HARD FESTIVAL, Gelsenkirchen (DE)

06 Jun – K.B. Hallen, Copenhagen (DK)*

9-11 Jun – SAARISTO OPEN AIR, Kaarina (FI)

10 Jun – ROCK IN THE CITY, Kuopio (FI)

11 Jun – SWEDEN ROCK, Sölvesborg (SE)

15 Jun – Dolina Charlotty, Charlotta (PL)*

17 Jun – Stadthalle, Zwickau (DE) *

18 Jun – AZKENA FESTIVAL, Vitoria-Gasteiz (ES)

21 Jun – Mitsubishi Electric Halle, Dusseldorf (DE)*

22 Jun – Jahrhunderthalle, Frankfurt (DE)*

25 Jun – HELLFEST, Clisson (FR)

29 Jun – Ippodromo San Siro, Milan (IT)*

07 Jul – SAUNA OPEN AIR, Tampere (FI)

08 Jul – ROCK IN THE CITY, Oulu (FI)

15 Jul – VAUHTIAJOT, Seinäjoki (FI)

16 Jul – ROCK IN THE CITY, Rovaniemi (FI)

30 Jul – SKOGSROJET FESTIVAL, Rejmyre (SE)

03 Aug – WACKEN OPEN AIR, Wacken (DE)

06 Aug – VAASA FESTIVAL, Vaasa (FI)

27 Aug – HRH Sleaze, Sheffield (UK)

*Supporting Alice Cooper For tickets and more information please visit: http://www.michaelmonroe.com/

Sami Yaffa has had a unique career as a musician both in Finland and around the world. First in Finland in the band Pelle Miljoona Oy and then as a founding member of the band Hanoi Rocks, with whom Yaffa lived the life of an international rock musician with all its spices. Fortunately for the man, there have been enough callers since Hanoi to keep him busy: Joan Jett and The Blackhearts and Hanoi Rocks’ big influence, the New York Dolls, to name a few were Yaffa’s bands for years before forming a new band with his old Hanoi Rocks partner Michael Monroe in 2009. This collaboration continues, but now Yaffa is also releasing music under his own name.

The second single from Sami Yaffa’s solo album ‘The Innermost Journey To Your Outermost Mind’ will be released. A song called ‘Down at St. Joe’s’ had been sitting in Yaffa’s desk drawer for a long time as a finished composition, but the lyrics were not coming together. Fortunately, Sami’s bandmate from the Monroe band, Rich Jones, came to the rescue.

“Rich had already written some lyrics for my album when I decided to send this song to him. I definitely wanted this song to be included on the album because it differs from the electronic world of the other songs on the album with its down-home acoustic approach. I wanted to raise a glass with the song to thank The Faces, Stones and Dylan for their brilliance and innovation. Eventually, the theme of the lyrics was found to be the king alcohol, its pros and cons and especially how close to a complete collapse one can get if it gets to take a stranglehold on your life. Richie’s ingenious lyrics brought this song to life, and it became one of my favourite songs on the album,” says Sami Yaffa.

 

Sami Yaffa: The Innermost Journey To Your Outermost Mind album will be released on September 3, 2021, in Finland by Vallila Music House and internationally by Cargo Records

 

 

Find Sami Yaffa online at: WEBSITE / FACEBOOK / INSTAGRAM